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  #31  
Old 08-03-2005, 05:44 PM
christiangirl christiangirl is offline
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I don't know about buying your books before school starts, I never do. It seems that I'd always buy my books according to what's needed for the class, then the professor changes his/her mind or and I need to get a different book. I nearly always buy my books online and most online sellers' return policy makes it nearly impossible for you to get your money back. I say go to class, be positive which book you need, then order it online with expedited shipping so you don't miss too much. Until then, see if you can borrow one from a classmate or talk to the professor about having a copy put in the library for those who do not have their books yet (you won't be the only one, I guaruntee it).

If you buy your books on-campus and they have a legit return policy, then this may not apply to you, but if not, it's what most students at my school do.
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  #32  
Old 08-03-2005, 05:48 PM
christiangirl christiangirl is offline
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Re: Credit Cards are Bad for You.

Quote:
Originally posted by Kasis-anon
I just have to add an "Amen" to the mention of credit cards. Avoid them like the plague. They are a terrible financial decision, do not saddle yourself with one of these until you actually have a full-time job and are able to pay for what you buy. Getting credit cards while in college have ruined many students credit ratings before they are even out in the "real world."
Just avoid them.
See, everyone says that, but what about when you want to rent, lease, whatever one day and you don't have a credit history? People get denied things, not just for having bad credit, but even for having no credit at all. I say get a card, then lock it up somewhere. It'll be there in an emergency, but for the most part, if you don't need it, just act like it's not there.
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  #33  
Old 08-03-2005, 07:50 PM
Munchkin03 Munchkin03 is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by aephi alum


As for credit cards, they're not necessarily the devil IF you know how to use them properly. If you do choose to get a credit card, pay it off in full every month. Don't buy something if you know it means you won't be able to pay your credit card bill. You'll be establishing a good credit rating, and you won't accrue revolving debt.
EXACTLY.

One thing I really dislike is when people try to tell you that credit cards are the devil. If you abuse credit--like anything else--it can be downright demonic. My advice would be to get a credit card, preferably one for students that has a very low limit. Pay it off every month. Make sure the interest rates are reasonable and you aren't paying a fee.

If you know that you don't want a credit card, but you know that you'll need your own credit to get an apartment, car, etc., get a bank account with an overdraft protection. I opened a bank account my first week in college that had overdraft insurance (I didn't care at the time, as I've never bounced a check), and never used the overdraft protection. It wasn't until I checked my credit report in March, after graduating from college and getting a Master's, that I found out that the overdraft protection that I had never used was helping to boost my credit score.

College advice:

1. Don't do activities you did in HS--unless you absolutely love them. I was all about student government in high school. I knew I wanted college to be a completely different experience, so I tried to do things that I was interested in--not things that necessarily looked good on a resume, or was something I did out of peer pressure in high school. Try something new. It's okay to change your mind now! Also--don't overwhelm yourself. One, maybe two, activities is probably enough for the first semester, when you're already experiencing a huge life transition.

2. STUDY ABROAD. Unless you have a major that prevents it, do it. If you're on financial aid, your school should be able to make up the difference for you.
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  #34  
Old 08-03-2005, 08:26 PM
flirt5721 flirt5721 is offline
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Agree with every one else GO TO CLASS

Start your homework even if the professor gives a give before its due. Not a good idea to start the day before.

If you college has a study hall where a lot of upper classmen hang out and do homework or whatever, go in there and hang out too.

Say HI to people. Greek or non-Greek. Its ok to be nice if you are in a fraternity or sorority or plan to be in one.

Go talk to your Freshman Advisor. They can really help you with you classes and give you good advice.

Take a fun class.

Don't take a class at 7:30 in the morning if you know you can wake up that early.

Find out where the Student Union, Financial Aid Office, Registars, Computer Labs, Library, and where your classes are located.

Join an organization that deals with your major and become active. Don't just go to one meeting and never go again.

If you are going to a school close to the US/Mexico or US/Canada board do go and party all the time. Its not a good idea. Especially "First Thursday" as its know here.

Meet guys. Make friends. You don't have to sleep with them all.

If you want to become involved with the student government, find out where the Assocated Student of whatever U is at and learn how to get involved.

If you are going into Math, Engineering, or Science, get yourself a TI-89 or equivalent. They are really great and very helpful.
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  #35  
Old 08-03-2005, 08:51 PM
honeychile honeychile is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Munchkin03
EXACTLY.

One thing I really dislike is when people try to tell you that credit cards are the devil. If you abuse credit--like anything else--it can be downright demonic. My advice would be to get a credit card, preferably one for students that has a very low limit. Pay it off every month. Make sure the interest rates are reasonable and you aren't paying a fee.

If you know that you don't want a credit card, but you know that you'll need your own credit to get an apartment, car, etc., get a bank account with an overdraft protection. I opened a bank account my first week in college that had overdraft insurance (I didn't care at the time, as I've never bounced a check), and never used the overdraft protection. It wasn't until I checked my credit report in March, after graduating from college and getting a Master's, that I found out that the overdraft protection that I had never used was helping to boost my credit score.
One of the first things I did when I got out of school (I was given an "incentive" NOT to get a credit card beforehand!) was to get two credit cards, buy something, pay the bills immediately, and then put the cards in a vault or in a freezer bag, then freeze them in a block of ice.
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  #36  
Old 08-04-2005, 09:16 AM
adpiucf adpiucf is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by christiangirl
I don't know about buying your books before school starts, I never do ... If you buy your books on-campus and they have a legit return policy, then this may not apply to you, but if not, it's what most students at my school do.
Having worked in a college bookstore, I advise any student attending a large public university to buy your books ahead of time-- because if you don't, someone else WILL and when you go to get your books, they're already sold out and and on back-order (even online!) The bookstores anticipate how many students there will be in the class based on the order provided by the professor. This doesn't mean they order the full number of books. If you have to purchase a shrink-wrapped packet, don't open it until your professor confirms that yes, this is the packet I want you to use. Once you open that shrink wrap, you can't return it. This goes for some new books that come in shrink wrap and workbooks.

You can get your full purchase price back during Add/Drop (and depending on the bookstore, possibly up to the Withdrawal Deadline).

Whenever and wherever you can, buy USED. Look for a book with minimal mark-ups. Feel free to write in your textbooks, but know that come book buy-back you'll get more money for a book with minimal mark-ups. Try to sell the book back to the store just before exams begin. Shop around for the best sell-back price-- you will probably get more money for it online than at the official campus boostore or one of the off-campus collegiate bookstores.

You won't be able to sell back a workbook. If you can, you will probably get about 50 cents-$2.00 for it, and those shrink-wrapped professor packets are yours to keep-- can't sell those.

The stores need only to buy back a certain number for their inventory. If you sell yours back earlier before the buy-back rush, you'll get more money for it. Or try to sell it to another student.
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  #37  
Old 08-05-2005, 10:38 PM
KSUViolet06 KSUViolet06 is offline
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KNOW WHEN IT'S TIME FOR YOU TO REGISTER and do it ASAP. Classes fill up faster than you think. As soon as the schedule bulletin or book is available, START figuring out what to take so you'll be ready come registration time.

*If you go Greek, get to know your older sisters. If they're in the same major as you, chances are they'll be able to give you a 'heads up' on some classes that will be difficult and take serious effort. They also might be a good resource for notes/help.

NEW MEMBERS- You WILL most likely feel a little overwhelmed during your new member period. There will be TONS of fun things to do, new people to meet, and info to learn. TALK to your new member class about it. Talk to your New Member Educators about it. They were you once and will be able to totally understand.

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Last edited by KSUViolet06; 08-29-2009 at 12:01 AM.
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  #38  
Old 08-05-2005, 11:02 PM
aggieAXO aggieAXO is offline
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for anyone going to A&M:

GO TO FISH CAMP-you will have the time of your life-and you will meet a lot of new people, I guarantee it.

Always check your professors out ahead of time. You should be able to go to the academic building (I think that is what the bldg is called, the bldg with the big dome) and look the professor up and look at the average grade-if a lot of people failed the class then I would avoid that particular professor. Ask upperclassman in your major about professors they recommend and those that they would avoid-this can help you avoid a horrible semester and a low grade.

Go to the football games -they are a blast!

If Mr. Bill s still there, he tutors in chemistry-he is wonderful!
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  #39  
Old 08-06-2005, 09:13 AM
KSUViolet06 KSUViolet06 is offline
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*This may sound like a no-brainer, but yes, college is a place to kind of reinvent yourself- BUT DON'T TELL FLAT OUT LIES ABOUT WHO YOU ARE. Don't lie and say your dad is the head of Target Corp. and flies a jet. Be yourself.

*Open your own bank account, if you don't already have one.

*If by chance you don't become Greek, DON'T LET THAT RUIN YOUR COLLEGE YEARS BY DWELLING ON IT ALL THE TIME. Don't think that there's NOTHING FUN TO DO IF YOU AREN'T IN A SORORITY. Even huge Greek schools have THOUSANDS of other student activities. It's okay to be upset for a bit. Rejection hurts. But eventually you HAVE to continue living. You've got 4 years ahead of you!
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Last edited by KSUViolet06; 08-06-2005 at 09:20 AM.
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  #40  
Old 07-11-2006, 07:03 AM
alum alum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ucfpnm
Actually, I don't necessarily agree with this. You need to build credit. Find one that's from a reputable organization- Visa, Mastercard etc- take the application home next chance you get (and if they try to pressure you into filling it out right then, just walk away) and look it over with your parents or other knowledgeable adults, and decide if maybe it's for you.

If you get it, DON'T use it all the time, or, really, even ever. Buy one expensive item with it, something that's like $300-$400, I don't know, a TV or something, and pay it off, in installments, on time, to establish credit. As long as you're not stupid with it, having a credit card should be no problem. Just only spend money that you know you have.
If it's a bank credit card, it probably will charge a high interest rate unless you pay your balance in full every month. Read the fine print and make sure you understand it. Paying your cc balance in full every month gives you a much better score than paying the minimum balance.
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  #41  
Old 07-11-2006, 08:41 AM
adpiucf adpiucf is offline
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Keep in touch with your parents. They haven't slept a wink since they dropped you off at State U. Seriously.

Oh and remember how incredibly dumb they got while you were in high school? Like, they didn't know anything? Amazingly, they have straightened themselves out and are a great resource for things like teaching or telling you about coupon clipping, saving money, credit cards, balancing check books, installing a light bulb and doing laundry.

Also, they're getting older and tend to be a bit forgetful. Hound them about getting their taxes done early so you don't get ripped on the FAFSA. I promise you that both you and your parents will be glad that you stayed on them when you're getting merit-based scholarships early in the financial aid cycle instead of receiving only loans.

They will also be good for helping you plot out classes. Use them as a sounding board. I doubt mom is using Calculus as much in her daily life, but she may be able to suggest some classes that may help you get ahead.


Also, now that you've picked a major... are you 110% certain you will be in this field your entire life? I didn't think so. Stick with the major, but take some courses outside of it to get a more liberal range of electives. If you're an English major, take Statistics and an Economics course. If you're an engineering major, take a non-technical writing course.

If you're pre-law, don't major in pre-law or poli-sci. Go with English or philosophy or liberal arts-- something more theory-based than vocational. The law schools see a ton of pre-law majors. Stand out. If you're going to get an MBA someday, you don't nececessarily need to major in a business-related field right now (much for the same reasons.) I've done my fair share of research on both of these professional degrees-- a unique profile stands out. Just make sure to earn high grades, get involved in a few meaningful activities/community service (excluding Greek Life) and work for a couple of years post-college. Then kick butt on the GMAT or LSAT.

Take one night a week where you do nothing with the sorority. Just kick back and chill. Sometimes it is good to have a girl-free day to put things in perspective. Oftentimes, whether you live in the house or not, living on top of so many women can stress you out. This can also be true of living in an apartment or dorm. Find your getaway spot.

As we've all been hammering home, don't make a mockery of yourself by fooling around with boys and wondering why they don't call. Here's a tip: you put out (or came close) and they got what they wanted. It's not 1956, but boys do still want a bit of chase. And guys in college tend to not be quite so relationship minded as they were in high school. Don't be one of their conquests. Respect yourself.

Go to bed at a reasonable hour.
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  #42  
Old 07-11-2006, 09:30 AM
LionTamer LionTamer is offline
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Take time putting your schedule together.

If you're not a morning person, don't fool yourself into thinking you'll be up and at 'em for a 7:30 class. If you fall asleep around 4 every afternoon, don't take a 3:30 class where they're going to be showing films or PowerPoint presentations in a darkened auditorium.

Also - if you are hopeless in a particular subject which is required to graduate:
This may only work at schools with huge sports systems, but when I failed Calculus at Giant State U (in spite of tutoring and intensive studying), someone suggested I find out when the football team took Calculus. Huh? Well, it turns out that some classes are way over-subscribed with sports stars who may not be the sharpest knives in the drawer. They're popular with the Jocks because the person in charge of team scholastics (and keeping the Big Dummies eligible) has discovered that they may be paced or graded so that even Mouth Breathers can stay in school. I was the only female in the class, (and the only person who weighed under 250) and I kid you not, all the CALCULUS tests were all true/false, and a 51 was a passing grade.

And yes, I passed (barely - thank God for the matricies chapter at the end of Calc, where I got 100%, because that pulled me up to a 52% and a barely-passing D.)
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  #43  
Old 07-11-2006, 09:36 AM
tunatartare tunatartare is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LionTamer
Take time putting your schedule together.

If you're not a morning person, don't fool yourself into thinking you'll be up and at 'em for a 7:30 class. If you fall asleep around 4 every afternoon, don't take a 3:30 class where they're going to be showing films or PowerPoint presentations in a darkened auditorium.

Also - if you are hopeless in a particular subject which is required to graduate:
This may only work at schools with huge sports systems, but when I failed Calculus at Giant State U (in spite of tutoring and intensive studying), someone suggested I find out when the football team took Calculus. Huh? Well, it turns out that some classes are way over-subscribed with sports stars who may not be the sharpest knives in the drawer. They're popular with the Jocks because the person in charge of team scholastics (and keeping the Big Dummies eligible) has discovered that they may be paced or graded so that even Mouth Breathers can stay in school. I was the only female in the class, (and the only person who weighed under 250) and I kid you not, all the CALCULUS tests were all true/false, and a 51 was a passing grade.

And yes, I passed (barely - thank God for the matricies chapter at the end of Calc, where I got 100%, because that pulled me up to a 52% and a barely-passing D.)
Why didn't I have smart friends like that to tell me these kinds of things when I was in college?
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  #44  
Old 07-11-2006, 10:16 AM
adpiucf adpiucf is offline
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Don't get used to taking afternoon naps and watching soap operas. The real world will quickly burst that bubble when you have an hour long commute and have to be at work by 8:30 AM. Get in the habit of treating college like a full time job in your junior and senior year and prepare for the inevitability. Do take a morning class in the fall and actually go to the class. You will be amazed at how much you can get done before 1 PM! I understand that not all of us are early risers or some are used to their afternoon nap-- but there are no milk and cookie nap times in the working world, so break that habit now while you can.

ETA: Greek Life is fun, but get involved in some other activities like a pre-professional club. If you're moving onto grad school, listing your sorority office on your resume as your greatest accomplishment looks trite. This isn't coming from me; just advice I have received from adcomms. Also remember that you're in school to get an education. Class before boys and socials.
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Last edited by adpiucf; 07-12-2006 at 09:02 PM.
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  #45  
Old 07-11-2006, 01:14 PM
Rollergirl2001 Rollergirl2001 is offline
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Don't know if this was mentioned or not but:

-If you are stuggling in a required class, GET A TUTOR. Your school offers free tutoring. Do not wait until the day before exam to go, because you'll be in a world of hurt. If there is someone on your floor that have taken the class and done very well, aske him/her for help.

-If someone in your hall is being too loud and if you are studying or sleeping, tell them. DO NOT BE AFRAID TO SPEAK UP. You hate to be a b, but you have to take care of your business. If thik problem continues, tell your Resident Advisor.

-If your Resident Adviosr (RA) is being difficult, DEAL WITH IT! You will deal with difficult people for the rest of your life (your boss, supervisor, etc.) If you had a difficult teacher in elem./middle/high school, you should be able to deal with it. He's/She's in charge of the floor and you have to go by their rules.

-If you want to get a good selection of classes for next semester/triemster, GO TO YOUR ADVISOR EARLY. If you do not, then expect the classes you want to be filled. And you may have to take night classes.

-If you walk on campus at night, have someone to walk with you. If you have no one, then CALL campus police for escort service. Many people say it's babyish, but you rather be safe and sorry, right? This is a must if you attend a school in a big city or attend a large school.

-On the first day, BRING NOTEBOOK AND PEN. On some classes, you will have to take notes. On others, you don't.

-Ignore the people on campus that are passing out credit card applications. Do not make eye contact. Get a debit card instead.

-Compromise with your roommate. You may not like him/her, but if you talk to him/her and agree on some guidelines, things will be much easier. For instance, if you have a 8 AM class, and you need to be in bed by 10 PM, tell her that. Because if you don't, things will be problematic.

-Establish a strong relationship with your professor. The more you get to know your professor and vice versa, the better the recommendations for grad/med/dental/business schools will be. But in order to get a good reccomendation, you have to meet with your professors and do well in the class and participate in class discussion.

-If you signed up for a class that you don't like the first day, drop beofre you receive a "W", because that "W" will appear on your transcript. And too many "W"s will harm you in getting into grad school.

Last edited by Rollergirl2001; 07-11-2006 at 01:25 PM.
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