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  #1  
Old 02-05-2013, 02:06 PM
Roselove Roselove is offline
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Would you give up Greek life to graduate early or 'on time'

I heard that most people graduate from university at 20. To do this that means that means one would have to graduate in 3 years at most. (excluding those that started early) I don't see how it would be possible to graduate this quickly unless you are strictly and only involved with academics.
If you could do it all over again, would you not get involved with Greek life so you could graduate early or 'on time'. Is it possible to graduate at the norm of 20 while being involved in anything other the school work?

I would not change if I could do it over again. I am proud to be in school, working and involved in Greek life. Still this case even if I don't graduate till I am nearly 23.
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  #2  
Old 02-05-2013, 02:14 PM
adpiucf adpiucf is offline
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Where did you hear this statistic that most people graduate at 20? I think it largely depends on the region. Although many students come into college with AP/IB credits and upperclassman standing, far more don't. Many four year degrees now take five years because of poor academic planning, changing majors, credits that don't transfer, schools not offering proper prerequisites in sequence, double majoring, working through school, etc. More people are going on to graduate school than ever before, as well.

I think that a student should strive to graduate on time. Unless you're saving a lot of money or taking a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, there's not much to be gained from graduating early.

It would be really ridiculous, in my opinion, to delay graduation for the sole purpose of participating in a student activity. People do it all the time. NCAA athletics are particularly shady about this, and I know of a few people who changed their majors or delayed graduation in order to become sorority president or to be elected to student government. Different strokes for different folks, but I guess some people go to college for an education and others go to play.

And yes, I would "give up" Greek Life to graduate on time. By this, I mean that being Greek is for a lifetime. So if I joined a sorority as a junior, I would still want to graduate on time and not extend the party for an extra three years so I could say I got my "full sorority experience." That would be terribly short sighted. I didn't go to college to go Greek. It was a great opportunity that supplemented my college experience and has enriched my life. I would advise any student considering/attending college to check out recruitment to see if Greek Life is right for them.
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Last edited by adpiucf; 02-05-2013 at 02:55 PM.
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  #3  
Old 02-05-2013, 02:53 PM
MysticCat MysticCat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselove View Post
I heard that most people graduate from university at 20.
I think you must have heard wrong. Or perhaps that average includes people whop graduated from community colleges with Associate degrees.

With the caveat noted adpiucf that many four-year programs are taking five-years these days, I'd think it's more like most people graduate around 22.
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  #4  
Old 02-05-2013, 03:01 PM
ComradesTrue ComradesTrue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselove View Post
I heard that most people graduate from university at 20. To do this that means that means one would have to graduate in 3 years at most. (excluding those that started early) I don't see how it would be possible to graduate this quickly unless you are strictly and only involved with academics.
If you could do it all over again, would you not get involved with Greek life so you could graduate early or 'on time'. Is it possible to graduate at the norm of 20 while being involved in anything other the school work?

I would not change if I could do it over again. I am proud to be in school, working and involved in Greek life. Still this case even if I don't graduate till I am nearly 23.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselove View Post
Perhaps my stories are not as entertaining as the other but here they are.

We had a girl rush. Whenever asked a question about liking something she replied with "No". After trying to find out something to talk about a sister asked her what she liked to do for fun she replied "Pretty much anything, I enjoy everything"......right

Another rush was wearing clothing that was clearly from goodwill. It was so bad she smelled like a used clothing store. You would think she would have a friend to borrow a dress from or at least find a way to minimize the smell.
How can you possibly be in college, already old enough to have done recruitment from the sorority side, and yet be under the ridiculous notion that "most" people graduate from college at age 20?

I call troll.
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  #5  
Old 02-05-2013, 09:55 PM
Roselove Roselove is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adpiucf View Post
Where did you hear this statistic that most people graduate at 20?.
I wish I could find the original post. It was linked to an article called 30 things you don't have to have before 30. It was said that someone should have 10 years post grad work experience by age 30.
I found it to loose credibility when taken down. I did not mean to make it seem like I was focusing on the age. It was more about graduating early vs having a life outside of school.
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  #6  
Old 02-05-2013, 10:30 PM
WCsweet<3 WCsweet<3 is offline
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I feel like I heard somewhere that the average college time was 6.4 years or something like that...

I had a few sisters who graduated early. One graduated a year ahead of time and managed to be very involved in the sorority, held leadership positions and was active in other areas as well. It depends on who you are as a person and your major. I know it wouldn't have worked well with me.
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  #7  
Old 02-06-2013, 01:21 AM
33girl 33girl is offline
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The only sister I had who graduated early was able to do so because she tested out of half her classes (when your dad owns a real estate business and you're a real estate major you can do that). I doubt if that weren't the case if she would have given up the sorority though, as that's how she met her husband!!

You have years and years of your life to work (because obviously there isn't going to be any Social Security in 15-20 years). Don't rush it.
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  #8  
Old 02-06-2013, 04:28 AM
GammaGirl1908 GammaGirl1908 is offline
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I think you may have misunderstood, or your source was misinformed. I think most people graduate at more like 21-23, and even 21-23 is assuming they take 4 years to get through school, and don't change majors, take a year off, take a couple of light semesters, or study a subject that commonly takes 5 years, like engineering or architecture (all very common events).

I graduated at 21. I took exactly 4 years to finish college (no summer courses, no time off, etc.), and I have a very late birthday AND I started school early. I started kindergarten at 4, whereas it's standard to be 5 or even 6 when you start kindergarten. I'm definitely considered to be on the young side for my class. Most of my classmates who graduated at 20 or 21 after 4 years skipped a grade somewhere. Most people I knew who finished in fewer than 4 years came in with a lot of credits (I came in with only 6 credits), and/or took a lot of summer courses, and/or had insane course loads and were crazed all the time.

But to answer your question, if I had my preference, no, I absolutely would not give up the social and networking aspects of the activities I was involved in during college just to have graduated at 20. I got almost as much out of my extracurriculars as I did out of my classes, plus people were impressed at how much I balanced while a student when looking at my resume. My activities and projects and jobs made for a good resume when I got out of college and started looking for work. If I'd taken a much heavier course load (and I usually took 15-17 credits), I wouldn't have been able to fit in anything but classwork.
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  #9  
Old 02-06-2013, 08:27 AM
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AOII Angel AOII Angel is offline
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No one graduates at 20. No one. (I'm being emphatic for effect, people.) I agree with Gammagirl. 21 is the youngest that people tend to graduate, and that isn't the average, because people on average are NOT finishing school in 4 years. If you have to beat a statistic, you can go back in time and finish college at 17 so you can beat my husband. He went to school at 13. Why does it matter to you what some random article vaguely implied about the age you should graduate from college? It shouldn't matter any more than the fact that my husband graduated at a younger age. No one gives you an award for graduating at a certain age. You're in school to get an education. Do it right and don't worry about your age.
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  #10  
Old 02-06-2013, 09:25 AM
TriDeltaSallie TriDeltaSallie is offline
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I took five years to get through and loved every moment of it. I did change my major which contributed to it. I could have gotten through in four years if I had pushed myself, taken more credits, done summer school, etc. but why put myself through that much extra stress?

You only get one chance to do college and enjoy those opportunities. I loved being involved on campus and held multiple leadership positions on campus, in the Greek system, and in my chapter. They were more valuable to me than probably 90% of my coursework.

Life after college is challenging enough. Most people graduating now will work until old age (and mostly not by choice). Enjoy your freedom and youth while you can.
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  #11  
Old 02-06-2013, 10:55 AM
AnchorAlumna AnchorAlumna is offline
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20? No. I was 17 when I started college, turned 18 at the end of November, and graduated at age 21. Never did summer school, CLEP didn't exist then.

So did daughter, except she also took classes every summer and had to wrangle a deal with her adviser so that she could graduate in 4 years and not 4 1/2 years (thanks to a course that was ONLY given in the spring except, of course, for the spring she planned to take it).
She did know a bunch of students who were 22 before they could get in all their courses.

I'm sure there are plenty of 20-year-old degree holders out there, but far fewer than older grads. Why hurry? Stay in school and enjoy that easy life!
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  #12  
Old 02-06-2013, 11:51 AM
ADPi95 ADPi95 is offline
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I graduated in 4 1/2 years at 22. I was 18 (turned 19 the Oct. of my first semester).
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  #13  
Old 02-06-2013, 12:32 PM
Roselove Roselove is offline
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To not have a good nest egg of savings (after 10 years of post college working), a great job (or at least an idea even of what you want to be), etc by 30? Then by when, because unless you ARE Gloria Steinem, opportunities don't get better and more frequent as you get older (she is being absurd if she is going to pretend great things come knocking at 60 and 70 and beyond)

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Like I said I could not find most of the original, but according to this post one should graduate at 20 and have post grad work by age 30. I feel that 22 and older is a fine time to graduate. Was just trying to point out that some people are under the impression you graduate at 20. Was just wondering if it was work the sacrifice if possible.
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  #14  
Old 02-06-2013, 01:13 PM
ADPi95 ADPi95 is offline
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Originally Posted by Roselove View Post
Like I said I could not find most of the original, but according to this post one should graduate at 20 and have post grad work by age 30. I feel that 22 and older is a fine time to graduate. Was just trying to point out that some people are under the impression you graduate at 20. Was just wondering if it was work the sacrifice if possible.
It wasn't from the original post. That comment you referenced and quoted above was from someone commenting on the post. The opinion of a casual reader who posts a comment doesn't necessarily make it fact.
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  #15  
Old 02-06-2013, 02:26 PM
33girl 33girl is offline
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yeah, and judging by most of the comments on that article, I don't think the woman who made that one necessarily had math skills or used them.

I can't believe this one dumb comment on a dumb article made a whole thread
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