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  #1  
Old 10-08-2004, 11:21 PM
preciousjeni preciousjeni is offline
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Greek News - Please post here

Greek system addresses diversity
Racial integration still a challenge

(University of North Carolina)

Article

"In the end, we have a lot in common."
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  #2  
Old 02-23-2005, 12:19 AM
preciousjeni preciousjeni is offline
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10% of Slaves in US were Muslim

Quote:
Author Sylviane Diouf said of the approximate 10 million African slaves that were traded into the Americas during the 16th century, 10 percent of them were Muslim. Diouf was a guest lecturer in Squires’ Black Cultural Center last night.
Good work, Eta, on sponsoring this event. I am really impressed by all the time that the organizations at VA Tech have put into Black History Month presentations. I wish I were there to educate myself further.

VA Tech Calendar (Flyer): http://www.diversity.vt.edu/bhm%20flyer.pdf
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  #3  
Old 02-25-2005, 04:55 AM
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Interesting. I would have thought the number would have been higher, considering that Nigeria, a "cleft country" as we say in political science, is about 50% Muslim, and many of the slaves brought over were from there, as well as other West African countries.

I once heard that the term "slave" comes from the word "Slav," from when the Romans used to enslave them back in the day, supposedly they liked them cos they were tall and blonde. I wonder to what degree is that true though...

Congrats to Eta for the wonderful seminar!

I'm trying to find the article in Speed magazine that someone did about us but I'm having no luck...=(

Jennis, PM me to let me know what's going on new in your life=)
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  #4  
Old 04-15-2005, 06:07 PM
preciousjeni preciousjeni is offline
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Wish I'd been there!

http://www.collegiatetimes.com/index.php?ID=5705
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  #5  
Old 04-19-2005, 07:23 PM
preciousjeni preciousjeni is offline
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More from Eta (VA Tech)

http://www.collegiatetimes.com/index.php?ID=5745
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  #6  
Old 04-26-2005, 07:38 PM
preciousjeni preciousjeni is offline
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TNX - Pi Chapter

Thanks to exlurker for sending us this!!!

Quote:
from exlurker

the U. of Virginia student paper -- April 25, 2005 -- has an article about various organizations receiving awards -- and Theta Nu Xi is one of them! The award, related to a diversity program presented by the sorority, is for the best small "CIO" -- which is U. of Virginia's abbreviation for "contracted independent organization" or in plain English, a recognized student org. Theta Nu Xi is mentioned in the third paragraph.......

http://www.cavalierdaily.com/CVArtic...23399&pid=1296
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  #7  
Old 05-03-2005, 04:44 PM
_Opi_ _Opi_ is offline
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Re: Wish I'd been there!

Quote:
Originally posted by preciousjeni
http://www.collegiatetimes.com/index.php?ID=5705
No wonder the name sounded fimiliar. My (bio) sister is trying to bring him to our campus for our local MSA.
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  #8  
Old 09-22-2005, 04:27 PM
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http://www.statepress.com/issues/2005/09/22/news/693975

Quote:
"I think there's a lot of issues in the world that are overlooked because people don't think they have effects on other people's lives," Smiley said.

Hernandez said since Theta Nu Xi is only two years old, it gives them an edge and offers something new to women who haven't found their niche yet.

"On an individual level and national level, we're women who are willing to roll up our sleeves and be agents of social change," Hernandez said.
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  #9  
Old 09-25-2005, 04:32 PM
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old news but...

story image 1 Photo by Rob Davis Freshman Bernie Johnson signs the One Campaign petition on the Union Green Friday, July 15, 2005.

FSUnited brings ONE Campaign to FSU
Benefit aimed to bring awareness to students

by Lauren Walleser
July 18, 2005

FSUnited presented a benefit for the ONE Campaign, a national effort to join Americans together to fight global AIDS and poverty, last friday on the Union Green.

The campaign has become largely publicized recently in light of the G8 summit, which took place from July 6 to July 8 in Scotland. Members of the ONE Campaign worked to put pressure on President George W. Bush and the other leaders who met at the summit to pass more aggressive legislation for helping poor countries, especially those in Africa.

"Every three seconds, a child dies from poverty. That's a big issue here, because we don't really think about other countries or Africa, because that is like another world to us," FSU student Tymerial Mckenzie, who assisted FSU student Sheena Payne in organizing the event, said. "We are trying to show our leaders that we are concerned about this. We aren't asking for money or donations or care packages. We just want people to be conscious of what is going on in the world."

Free food and entertainment was available on the Union Green as groups like the Progressive Student Assembly, Student Government Association, and Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority, Inc. gave out information on world issues related to the Campaign. FSUnited also had volunteers asking students to sign petitions that would be sent to President Bush to let him know of students' concern about the issues of poverty and AIDS. In exchange for signing the petition, students received a bracelet from the ONE Campaign.

"As college students, we think we are broke, but we are really rich compared to them," Mckenzie said. "95% of the people who have AIDS are in developing countries in Africa and Asia. We just want to push our leaders to do something about this."

The ONE Campaign was originated by a number of groups, including Bread for the World, CARE, DATA, International Medical Corps, International Rescue Committee, Mercy Corps, Oxfam America, Plan USA, Save the Children US, World Concern, World Vision, and is supported by InterAction. The Campaign has been supported by celebrity spokespersons such as Bono of U2, Brad Pitt, and basketball star Dikembe Mutombo.

For more information on the ONE Campaign, visit www.ONE.org.story here
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  #10  
Old 09-25-2005, 04:38 PM
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more

story image 1 Photo by: Ashley Posusta Migrant worker Romeo Ramirez, far left, had his story translated into English by Lupita Vasquez, right. Far right: The Coalition of Immokalee Workers brought a number of items, including T-shirts and pamphlets, to last week's discussion.

Migrant workers speak out
Immokalee laborers demand human rights, higher wages

by Lauren Walleser
November 29, 2004

Corporations must take responsibility for the ongoing human rights violations of migrant workers, creating better conditions and higher wages, migrant workers Romeo Ramirez and Gerardo Reyes Chavez told Florida State University students Monday night.

Ramirez and Chavez are members of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, a group of migrant tomato pickers from Immokalee who claim they are working to gain benefits, better wages and working conditions for themselves and other migrant workers in the United States.

The coalition is currently running the "Taco Bell Truth Tour," a protest moving throughout the country seeking to spread the word to boycott corporations such as Taco Bell and other Yum! Brands, Inc. businesses that use tomatoes picked by these workers.

Ramirez gave a historical account that explained why workers from Mexico and other countries have poured into the United States and are forced to work under such conditions.

Since the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement, American corporate giants have built factories with sweatshop-like conditions in these foreign nations, Ramirez said, putting small entrepreneurial farmers out of business and forcing them to come to the United States in order to find work to support their families.

"We as farmers in Mexico cannot compete with big corporations in the United States," Ramirez said. "What is left to do when what you cultivate and farm has no value?"

Conditions in the United States for these workers are not much better. According to Ramirez, migrant tomato pickers today work for the same wages today that they did in 1980, although the cost of living in America has risen significantly. Workers make approximately 40 cents for each 32-pound bucket of tomatoes that they pick, and must pick two tons of tomatoes each day in order to make $50 per day. These wages are barely enough for the workers to survive themselves, let alone support their families back in their native land, Ramirez said.

"We have no benefits, no medical insurance, and there is no right to organize, especially in the fields," Ramirez said.

Chavez spoke of another type of worker that exists today in America, the "modern day slave."

According to Chavez, some workers are recruited at the borders and taken to migrant camps where they are forced to work for $20 or less per day, depending on what the boss decides to pay them. They must also follow strict rules laid down by the bosses, and there are documented cases of violence against workers who disobey. These workers are made indebted to their bosses and work under the strict supervision of armed guards, Chavez said, and are not allowed to leave or change jobs without the risk of being severely beaten or even killed.

"This is the kind of slavery that we are talking about -- where to open your mouth for a grievance, you're going to end up dead," he said.

A video was shown following the presentation that depicted the conditions that workers are often faced with, and showed both the poverty and violence that surrounds the lives of these migrant workers.

Chavez and Ramirez encouraged students not to succumb to glamorous advertising, and to do all that they can to support the workers' cause by boycotting Taco Bell and other companies that get their tomatoes and other products from workers who are underpaid and abused.

"I am not sure why they are picking on us," Taco Bell spokesperson Laurie Schalow said. "We are one of the smallest buyers. Lots of quick-serve restaurants get their tomatoes from that region: McDonald's, Burger King, Subway."

Schalow also claimed Taco Bell representatives have met several times with coalition members and have made efforts to help them.

Taco Bell agreed to pay a one cent per pound increase, like the coalition requested, if all the other restaurants would pay it too, Schalow said.

"We even sent them a check. They returned it," she said.

The presentation was sponsored by MEChA, Lambda Theta Phi Latin Fraternity, Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority, the Puerto Rican Student Association, Students United for Peace & Justice, and the Center for Participant Education. Ramirez and Chavez had their remarks translated by FSU student Lupita Vasquez.

Students who attended the event had many questions for the workers and seemed generally motivated to do something for the cause.

"It was very compelling," FSU junior Avril Wood McGrath said. "You don't think that things like this happen anymore."

The presentation took place Monday of last week in the Student Life Building.story here
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  #11  
Old 09-25-2005, 04:50 PM
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http://www.fsunews.com/vnews/display...0?in_archive=1

story image 1 Jason Carney is a reformed skinhead who now celebrates racial and ethnic diversity. He has appeared on HBO's Def Poetry Jam and will perform Tuesday at Club Downunder. Photo courtesy of Jason Camey

SCE 'slams' studies
Student Campus Entertainment brings music and slam poetry to Club Downunder Tuesday

by Corey Janssen
April 19, 2004

With the end of the semester brings the onset of countless stress-inducing activities, mainly in the form of last minute cramming for final exams. Student Campus Entertainment (SCE) knows this and will offer one last Take A Load Off Tuesday at Club Downunder as a means of alleviating some of this strain, however temporary it is. The final SCE event of the semester will feature HBO's Def Poetry Jam's Jason Carney. Also included in the night's events will be readings by the Back Talk! Poetry Troupe, as well as music by DJ J-Will.

Jason Carney is known for his no-holds-barred style of spoken word and memorable style of slam poetry. However he was not always the literati he is today. Once a skinhead who abhorred minorities and homosexuals, and used violence as a method to display his hate, Carney made massive changes to his life and has since become an advocate of tolerance and diversity.

"Jason's poetry is emotional and in-your-face," SCE Culture and Arts chairman Dorian Rogers said. "He makes you question every stereotype you have ever had and then he helps you prepare the proper burial for them. And the best thing is, there is very little mourning afterward."

Carney's performances speak of his acceptance of all individuals as equals. Since his transformation from drug-abusing, prejudiced skinhead to accepting artist, Carney has authored a book, "Flesh Is Only Lucid Language."

He also speaks out at college campuses, high schools and youth centers. Carney's performances have frequently been called stunning and thought-provoking and he has been said to be considered a "redneck superhero."

"I know Jason (Carney) personally and it is inspiring to see a man who has changed from a racist into a racial activist," Rogers said. "Jason is the epitome of what we can all become if we refuse the lies we have been taught and accept the truth."

The other featured poetic act of the night comes from the Back Talk! Poetry Troupe. This troupe is widely considered Florida's finest conglomerate of spoken word artists. Founded in 1998, the troupe has performed at numerous poetry slam competitions, expos and seminars, among many other events.

A number of poets with membership to the troupe go on to win accolades and awards at poetry slam competitions, both local and national. More information about the group can be found at www.blackonblackrhyme.com.

"Back Talk! is the culture that Tallahassee has (needed) for years," Rogers said. "It performs every Thursday at Mt. Zion's Calypso Caf� and is a safe haven for lovers of art who realize the importance of getting away from the monotony of a generation that doesn't like to think anymore."

The final Take A Load Off Tuesday is sponsored by the SCE, as well as numerous other student organizations. These co-sponsors include NPHC, Theta Nu Xi, Lambda Theta Alpha, Lambda Theta Phi, Lambda Tau Omega, PBM, Inc. and SISTUHS.

E-mail A&E@fsview.com with your thoughts and comments.
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  #12  
Old 09-25-2005, 04:53 PM
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http://www.fsunews.com/vnews/display...3?in_archive=1

story image 1 Professor Thomas Rashid, a faculty member at FAMU, was the keynote speaker at Thursday's "From Africa to America" lecture. Rashid was filling in the for Muneer Fareed, who was unable to attend the lecture due to an airline delay. Photo by: Kenny Luba

Students contemplate racial inequality
Student groups observe Black History Month with racism discussion

by Sara Guiffre
February 16, 2004

With the cancellation of the discussion on Apartheid in South Africa that was supposed to take place Thursday due to the delay of scheduled speaker Muneer Fareed's airline flight, various locals took over and presented the topic of racism to over 100 people in the Oglesby Union Ballroom.

Naielah Ackbarali of the Muslim Student Association served as moderator for the new topic, "From Africa to America."

The event began with a reading from the Koran. Then, Eman Karaman, president of the Muslim Student Association, explained that in light of Black History Month, the sponsors wanted to put on an event to raise the ideas of racial equality in students' minds.

"We're not here to just listen to the speaker, but for the ideas," Karaman said. "The main reason we are here is to learn something. We need to go beyond our biases and our ignorance. I really have mad respect for those who attended our event tonight."

Latoya Joseph, a member of the FSU Chapter of the NAACP, spoke briefly of the NAACP's founding day and the impact the NAACP has had on America and FSU.

"On Feb. 12, 1909, there was a call for the struggle of civil equality for blacks and whites in America," Joseph said. "Six people answered that call, and it turned into the NAACP. We have over 500,000 members now, with 1,700 branch chapters. In 1974, several FSU students felt the need to create a FSU chapter, and so it was."

After another speaker recounted his recent visit to South Africa, Larry Green of the Progressive Black Men came out next to introduce the guest speaker, Thomas Rashid, a professor from FAMU.

During his lecture, Rashid spoke of his dislike of racial identifiers.

"These names that we are given -- African-American, Caucasian-American -- we take things for granted," Rashid said. "Many of us don't challenge these things that we have been given. These names label us and define us. You're not white. I'm not black. There's a power that's dividing this humanity."

Rashid used a personal experience, recounting how he changed his name as an example.

"We have been named by Caucasian people," Rashid said. "We are still naming ourselves after white folks. All of these labels divide us up, and breeds what we call racism. Obedience to God is the only thing that makes you different."

Rashid used religion as one of his primary lecture points. Rashid was raised a Christian but converted to Islam in the 1970s.

"They (Caucasians) use Jesus as God. Why do they paint him white with blue eyes?" Rashid said. "They use it as a tool of superiority against blacks."

Rashid said that these racial barriers must be overcome for the good of humanity.

"We have to respect each other and get along as brothers and sisters," Rashid said. "We are one humanity. We are one family."

Naielah Acknarali closed the event and spoke of how we must "battle racism and unite together."

The event was co-sponsored by the Muslim Student Association, Lamba Tau Omega sorority, the FSU Chapter of the NAACP, Theta Nu Xi Multicultural sorority, the Progressive Black Men, Amnesty International, the African Student Association and Students United for Peace & Justice.
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  #13  
Old 10-16-2005, 12:26 AM
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Student groups discuss gay rights issues

Student groups discuss gay rights issues
LGBTSU and Theta Nu Xi join together for panel discussion

Lauren Walleser

September 29, 2005

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Student Union and Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority at Florida State University hosted a panel discussion last Wednesday, Sept. 21 regarding the issue of homosexuals in the United States military and the "Don't ask, don't tell" policy that is currently the rule for homosexuals that are members of a military branch.

The panel consisted of members from both organizations, including Jamonique Holt and Letoya Stairs of Theta Nu Xi and Jeremy Lighter, Jenna Berger, and Thomas Kester of the LGBTSU, all students of FSU who expressed that they have had positive experiences with homosexuality in their lives.

Holt, whose father is an officer in the military and spent much of her life abroad, said that she did not encounter any people who were out as homosexuals in the military.

"When someone becomes an officer, they give a handbook to everyone in the family telling them how to act," Holt said. "If you get to become an officer, they will find out everything."

Lighter, who said he has been out since the age of 18, also has a father in the military, but as an enlisted man rather than an officer. He expressed that his experience was rather different, as he did know many soldiers who were openly gay.

"There are a lot of things that the enlisted men do and know about each other that doesn't necessarily make it all the way up to command," said Lighter.

All of the panelists agreed that it is difficult for men and women in the military to be themselves and express who they are if they are gay due to discrimination they would face if they revealed they were gay.

"For me, the discrimination against me can't be erased," said Holt, a black woman. "That has made me sensitive to other people being discriminated against, and that is why when it comes to issues like homosexuals being able to get married, I'm like, 'Let them go ahead,' because right now you might not be discriminated against, but when it happens to you, you will feel differently."

The discussion expanded to cover issues such as the differences that culture, location, race and religion play in people's experiences with, and exposure to, the homosexual lifestyle. Many of the panelists were from South Florida and discussed how open that community is in comparison to smaller towns in the country. Others said that in high school they were less likely to come out as being homosexual because of the immaturity of classmates, the smaller environment, and the fact that they still lived with their parents.

"People feel that people grow to be gay, and that myth is perpetuated because people usually don't come out until they get into college. That means that people are thinking that all those years you are straight and happy," Holt said. "I think that really has a profound effect on how people look at homosexuals, because if we find out that you are born gay or that it is certain chemicals, then that will blow a hole through every theory."

Stairs said that she believes it is the diversity and open-mindedness of college campuses that allow students to come out or realize how they truly feel about gender issues.

"In college, we are exploring a whole new community and really learning and educating ourselves about sex, about gender, about what our social roles are as women and men, and what we are expected of as social beings in our environment, and you really start taking a look at yourself and start figuring out who you are, and for those reasons we start to think about where we fit in the world and what our preferences are and what we do and don't like, and it is really that exploration of self that brings people to the point where they become comfortable enough to place themselves in the world," Stairs said.

Another topic that was discussed was the over-classification of people and their sexual orientation. Lighter and Berger agreed that rather than labeling people as being gay, straight or any other category, love is what should be the emphasis for relationships.

"I think that realistically, if you genuinely believe in the power of love, that you could fall in love with someone of either sex," Lighter said. "Love is a power beyond measure. To say that I'm only going to fall in love with tall, white, gay men is completely irrational. You can't stop someone from falling in love with someone else."

Others, such as Siria Serrano, the moderator for the panel discussion and member of Theta Nu Xi, told of the trouble some people have with trying to support homosexuals, even if they themselves are straight.

"I like men, but anytime that you speak up about something or you say that something is wrong or today I don't feel like wearing heels or mascara, or you speak out in a certain way about sex roles, people are like 'Oh, you are a feminist,' or 'You are a lesbian.'" Serrano said.

While college campuses are known to be more accepting environments, there are still groups and individuals at universities who do not agree with the idea of homosexuality, and there are those who will discriminate against individuals who are open about their orientation.

Kester told the group that he experienced discrimination when he tried to run for a position in student government at his former university, the University of North Florida.

"I stood in front of their student senate there, in which they made fun of me and voted not to appoint me," Kester said.

Dustin Hinzman of the FSU LGBTSU said that the organization tries to reach out to other organizations on campus and get together with them in order to promote diversity and get information to students about LGBT issues. For example, Hinzman said that in the coming months the LGBTSU will join together with the Jewish Student Union in order to discuss issues such as the fact that homosexuals, along with Jews, were persecuted during the Holocaust.

"Diversity movements have focused on how we are all different and accepting, but the newest thing in diversity movements is looking at how we are all the same. Co-sponsorships help with that," Hinzman said.

To learn more about the LGBTSU or how to get involved, visit www.fsu.edu/~activity/sga/lgbtsu/ . To learn more about Theta Nu Xi Multicultural Sorority, visit www.theatnuxi.org.
http://www.fsunews.com/vnews/display...8?in_archive=1
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  #14  
Old 02-08-2006, 12:30 PM
tnx_soulanna tnx_soulanna is offline
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AG In the News!!!

Alpha Gamma has officially made the news!!!

Theta Week puts College's diversity on display
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  #15  
Old 02-27-2006, 12:40 PM
preciousjeni preciousjeni is offline
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http://www.dailytarheel.com/media/pa...ilytarheel.com

CONGRATS Alpha Chapter!
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