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  #1  
Old 03-07-2002, 09:36 PM
AKA2D '91 AKA2D '91 is offline
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Question Public school teachers whose child(ren) attend(s) private schools

Many public school teachers enroll their own children in private or parochial schools. What does this say, if it says anything about the teacher? How do you feel about this? Does private mean better qulaity while public means poor quality?

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  #2  
Old 03-07-2002, 10:16 PM
SAEalumnus SAEalumnus is offline
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The answer is actually quite simple:

1. Teachers have their employment in public schools because that's where the money is (well, granted there isn't really that much money to begin with, but private school teachers get paid even less than public school teachers who hardly get paid anything at all); and

2. Teachers enroll their children in private school because it's a better atmosphere for a proper education. In public schools, you find a lot more overcrowding, social promotion and behavioral problems that you rarely find in private schools (parents are a lot more proactive in disciplining their children when they're forking out several thousand dollars a year in private school tuition which they could forfeit if their kid gets expelled).

Plain and simple economics; nothing more, nothing less.
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  #3  
Old 03-08-2002, 12:14 AM
Wonderful1908 Wonderful1908 is offline
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Lightbulb

I am a public school teacher who teaches in a school for children who have been retained due to discipline problems, and/or sometimes someone simply did not take the time with these students and this is where they end up. I did my student teaching at a private/public school so I have seen both sides of the fence. As teachers we often complain about a lack of resources, parental involvement, low pay, etc.
At the school I am at now I wold LOVE to complain about some of the "problems" I thought I had at the pivate school I did student teaching at. Oh my gosh! I had to sometimes chase parents away with a bat at the private school, and now I can't even get a parent to call me back. We don't even have a copy machine for teachers at my school now.
The point is my four year old will be in kindergarten in the fall and I have applied for admission to two private schools. I am an employee and an educator who does value and believe in my school systems "potential", but more importantly I am a parent and I do not have the time or luxury nor will I use my child as practice while I am waiting for public schools to catch up to their potential.
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  #4  
Old 03-08-2002, 12:39 AM
VirtuousErudite VirtuousErudite is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Wonderful1908
I am a public school teacher who teaches in a school for children who have been retained due to discipline problems, and/or sometimes someone simply did not take the time with these students and this is where they end up. I did my student teaching at a private/public school so I have seen both sides of the fence. As teachers we often complain about a lack of resources, parental involvement, low pay, etc.
At the school I am at now I wold LOVE to complain about some of the "problems" I thought I had at the pivate school I did student teaching at. Oh my gosh! I had to sometimes chase parents away with a bat at the private school, and now I can't even get a parent to call me back. We don't even have a copy machine for teachers at my school now.
The point is my four year old will be in kindergarten in the fall and I have applied for admission to two private schools. I am an employee and an educator who does value and believe in my school systems "potential", but more importantly I am a parent and I do not have the time or luxury nor will I use my child as practice while I am waiting for public schools to catch up to their potential.



I totally agree with you Wonderful1908,

Although I am not quite a teacher I did begin my first semester of student teaching at our University lab school. The parents are extremely active in the classrooms and many parents stay 30 min. to an hour after dropping their children off EVERY morning to help their children transition into the day and assist with morning activities. As unfortunate as it is you will not fin d this kind of participation in 99.9% of public schools. The children have many more opportunites for growth than children at local public schools. If a teacher puts their child in a private school while teaching at a public school it may just mean the teacher wants the absolute best opportunites for their child. If they can afford it I say go for it.
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  #5  
Old 03-08-2002, 01:04 AM
DeltaBetaBaby DeltaBetaBaby is offline
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This is something that hasn't been considered yet:

Some teachers do not want their children to go to the school at which they teach. They don't want any personal issues/conflicts to interfere with their professional lives.
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Old 03-08-2002, 08:31 AM
Serenity Serenity is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by SAEactive2. Teachers enroll their children in private school because it's a better atmosphere for a proper education. In public schools, you find a lot more overcrowding, social promotion and behavioral problems that you rarely find in private schools (parents are a lot more proactive in disciplining their children when they're forking out several thousand dollars a year in private school tuition which they could forfeit if their kid gets expelled).
This pretty much sums up my reasons for sending my son to private school although I teach at a public school. Another big factor for me was religious education. I wanted God allowed in my son's classroom. I don't mind paying tuition when my son gets a lot individual attention (smaller class size), his own textbooks/workbooks/arts & craft supplies , and even physical discipline (w/parental consent) if/when he steps out of line.
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  #7  
Old 03-08-2002, 10:38 AM
lovelyivy84 lovelyivy84 is offline
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My mother is a teacher in public school and sent me to private for pretty much the same reasons that Wonderful listed.

I went to a Catholic school first and when they wanted to skip me two grades she decided she needed to dfind someplace that was academically challenging for me, and in NYC that meant a private school. I HATED it and bear a lot of emotional stuff from my time there but I know that she was doing what was best for me at the time and I can't argue with that.

But to parents who are sending their kids to private school, especially ones where they are minorities, PLEASE be careful and above all talk to your kids to see what is going on! It can be overwhelming for a child to enter an environment where they are always the other and you will have to compensate at home.

You can't shield your child from what they will encounter but you have to prepare them for it and talk to them about it. Make sure that they always retain confidence in themselves because in that environment it's very easy to let your sense of self slip away.
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  #8  
Old 03-08-2002, 06:07 PM
AKA2D '91 AKA2D '91 is offline
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I don't know about that....

Quote:
Originally posted by DeltaBetaBaby
This is something that hasn't been considered yet:

Some teachers do not want their children to go to the school at which they teach. They don't want any personal issues/conflicts to interfere with their professional lives.
My father was my elementary school principal. Before that, my sister came through the same primary school with her father as principal. The same rules applied, we both got our a$$ whipped at school, then we had to contend with moms when we got home. My mother still attended PTA, even though her spouse was there. There were not any conflicts or issues...

Then, my mother taught in the junior high setting. My sister and I went to the same school where she taught. The same thing applied, however, my mother made it perfectly clear to her collegeagues that she only wanted to discuss matters with them concerning her children at the appropriate time...ie planning periods, not over the water cooler.

I attended Wonderful's "private" school too. I had to get my buttocks back into the public school. LOL

But, I've seen it where my elementary teachers had their children in private schools. These private schools were established for only CERTAIN people, and I mean CERTAIN. So, that too is another factor to consider.

When I started the thread, I thought about what I've heard colleagues mention. One of our administrator's child attends private school. "How can you teach someone in a system, but you do not have enough faith/trust in that system to educate your child?


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  #9  
Old 03-08-2002, 06:25 PM
prayerfull prayerfull is offline
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Both of my parents were administrators in the public school system (Dad, a Vice Prin and Mom, a counselor).

They sent us to private school from Pre-School through 12th grade. Pre-8th we went to a private Catholic school, high school was a private prep day/boarding school. Soror AKA2D'91 is on point about those school being made for "certain people". Being the only black child in my class all the way the preschool through 8th grade was tough on a little BAP girl. HC I was the only child who had to make sure my swimcap was air-tight during swim class? HC all the questions about what I was putting in my hair or why I didn't wash my hair every day? sorry...had to release that flashback...)

Why? Though they believed strongly in the public school system, they felt that the education and opportunities were stronger in private schools. As a parent now, I have chosen a private christian school for my kids. I've opten for a christian school rather than a catholic school, because of my family's religous preferences. In this particular school, my kids will also usually have at least 1 or 2 other black children in their classes. The public school district where we live is currently trying to cutback $6 million annually from its budget. To do so, they are closing schools, increasing class sizes, eliminating librarians and music programs, and also eliminating the Gifted and Talented program.

My parents felt that they worked hard to be able to afford to send us to the schools we went to and I really appreciate their sacrifices. I was more prepared for college than most of the freshman who went to public schools. I can honestly say that my senior year of high school was far tougher than my freshman year of college.
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Old 03-08-2002, 07:23 PM
AKA2D '91 AKA2D '91 is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by prayerfull


My parents felt that they worked hard to be able to afford to send us to the schools we went to and I really appreciate their sacrifices. I was more prepared for college than most of the freshman who went to public schools. I can honestly say that my senior year of high school was far tougher than my freshman year of college.

I understand that. However, it wasn't that my parents could not afford to send us to a private school, but why do that when there are capable teachers to provide the same education? I had dayum good teachers growing up. I admit, this was in another era, but from K-6, 8, my teachers were excellent. Those teachers (primarily all were AA, except 3 or 4) were OLD SCHOOL. In high school, I went to a magnet school, which was college prepatory, that training stayed with me throughout college and graduate school.

I sometimes feel that this is the reason why the public school has faltered. Why should one care whether or not Shameka or Dre passes? Who cares about accountability because my so and so is not affected.
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Old 03-08-2002, 07:45 PM
AKAtude AKAtude is offline
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Post Re: I don't know about that....

Quote:
Originally posted by AKA2D '91
"How can you teach someone in a system, but you do not have enough faith/trust in that system to educate your child?
I agree.
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Old 03-08-2002, 11:36 PM
ClassyLady ClassyLady is offline
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My mother has been a public school teacher and administrator for the last thirty years. My sisters and I all attended a private elementary school before we moved out into the public school system. We went from pre-K until the 6th grade and then we all attended public middle and high schools.

Although my mother believes in the value of the public school system, she understood the common shortcoming of it that can hinder a student's success. She wanted all of us to have a firm educational background and to be able to learn in a somewhat "safe" environment before attending public school.

Quote:
Originally posted by prayerfull
HC I was the only child who had to make sure my swimcap was air-tight during swim class? HC all the questions about what I was putting in my hair or why I didn't wash my hair every day? sorry...had to release that flashback...)
At my elementary school, I was the only black student in my class almost every year, until I was 11 years old. I had to deal with white teachers who had no clue what they were doing trying to comb my hair for school pictures (remember those little black combs with the tiny teeth). Other kids asked me stupid questions like "do you get tan in the summertime?" One little girl actually asked me if I liked being black. And, this was supposed to be a multicultural school.
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Old 03-09-2002, 11:10 AM
prayerfull prayerfull is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by AKA2D '91
but why do that when there are capable teachers to provide the same education?
I might get alot of flack for this, but I do not feel that the education provided in the public school system is the same as private schools. Now, this may not be the case in all areas/school districts. But here in Monterey, CA it is the case. I know that as I was growing up, the curriculum that my private school provided was 2 grades ahead of what public school classes at my grade were doing. My son is in Kindergarten now and his class is doing alot of the same material that 1st and 2nd graders I know are doing in public schools.

In addition to that, test scores in my area are higher at the private schools. In my high school, 100% of my class went onto college...only one person went onto a junior college (and that was frowned upon). In the public high schools, the percentages are drastically different...only a small percentage go on to 4yr colleges, some to 2yr colleges, some to trade/business schools...many just go out and get jobs.

Once again, this is just my opinion and stems from what happens where I live. Further, I agree 100% that a students' progress relies desperately on parental involvement and interaction..public school or private school.
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Old 03-09-2002, 06:29 PM
SATX*APhi SATX*APhi is offline
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I am not a public school teacher whose children attend private school; however, I am a student who attends a private university and attended public school from kindergarten up until I graduated from high school. I just wanted to express my feelings about both private and public schools.

I love being at a private school. I know that going to a private university is different that going to a private elementary, middle or high school, but through my experiences attending a private university, I have decided to enroll my children in private school throughout their life.

The class-size average at my university is somewhere around 23 students. In my opinion, this provides for a better learning environment for the students. The class-size average is no where near the class averages of a publich university. I also think that the quality of teaching at a private school is better than that of a public school. (I did attend a public junior college for a spring semester and summer session.)

In between classes, in our quad, we occasionally have a small, 5 minute prayer service. Now that it is lent, we have been having at least one a week. Also, for Catholic holidays, usually our 9:20am and 10:20am classes are cancelled so that we can all go and celebrate mass together.

On September 11th, I went to my 9:45am government class where my teacher knew nothing about what had happened. Stunned, he said it was only right that we not have class and all go to the chapel to pray. This would have never happened at a public school.
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Old 03-09-2002, 08:07 PM
jali0004 jali0004 is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by SATX*APhi

On September 11th, I went to my 9:45am government class where my teacher knew nothing about what had happened. Stunned, he said it was only right that we not have class and all go to the chapel to pray. This would have never happened at a public school.
I go to a BIG TEN University, and this happened at my school as well....this was a special situation, so maybe it's not fair to use that example, ya know???


With that aside, I am also not the child of an educator, but I attended Catholic school from K-12, and I am so grateful that my mother did that for me!! With the money she spent on my pre-college education, she could've bought a house when I was younger, and bought us matching Cadillacs...but she sacraficed so much for my education....

I grew up in Chicago, and there was a point when the public schools were on strike all the time. My step-sister attended a public high school. She wasn't alowed to take books home (WTF??), her "Chemistry" class was in the cafeteria (big sinks I guess), and the average class size was over 30 students. Even as a teacher, why would you want your kids subject to that when you have the means to pay for a better education???

Up here in Minnesota, there is a school district that has cut back educational funding so much, that teachers are getting laid off, school days last from 9am-1pm, and the school WEEK is cut to FOUR days....

To the question at hand, maybe these educators or school administrators feel they can help their community build up, and become better, that's why they work in publc schools--and till that time comes, they send their kids to private schools.
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