GreekChat.com Forums  

Go Back   GreekChat.com Forums > GLO Specific Forums > Delta > Delta Sigma Theta


Register Now for FREE!
Join GreekChat.com, The Fraternity & Sorority Greek Chat Network. To sign up for your FREE account INSTANTLY fill out the form below!

Username: Password: Confirm Password: E-Mail: Confirm E-Mail:
 
Image Verification
Please enter the six letters or digits that appear in the image opposite.

  I agree to forum rules 

» GC Stats
Members: 306,814
Threads: 114,615
Posts: 2,156,597
Welcome to our newest member, llyssb290
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-20-2003, 05:29 PM
Rain Man Rain Man is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Studio 33 (aka The Bob Barker Studio), CBS Television City
Posts: 1,608
Exclamation New National IDs/Mark of the Beast is coming....PRAY UP!!

GCers, the book of Revelations is about to be at hand.
Get into a right relationship with God and keep it tight, because you are DEFINATELY going to need Him in the upcoming days.
You don't believe me---READ ON!!!


New national ID plan checks in

By Declan McCullagh
Special to ZDNet
February 18, 2003, 4:52 AM PT

COMMENTARY--A little-known company called EagleCheck is hoping to provide a standardized identity check technique that governments and corporations will use to verify that you are who you claim to be.
EagleCheck, a privately held firm in Cleveland proposes that whenever someone uses a driver's license or a passport for identity verification, the ID's authenticity will be checked through EagleCheck's network that is tied to state motor vehicle and federal databases. The databases will respond by saying whether the ID is valid.

I ran into David Akers, EagleCheck's president, last week in a Senate office building where he was hawking his system to a crowd of politicians understandably nervous about Threat Level Orange, Osama bin Laden, and possible terrorist attacks sparked by a loominginvasion of Iraq. Stacked on a table were brochures warning in stark crimson letters that "EagleCheck could have flagged" 14 of the 19 terrorists who hijacked planes on Sept. 11, 2001, because some had used expired visas and stolen passports.

Akers has had some success so far. In December, the Transportation Security Administration gave permission for EagleCheck to link its systems "to government databases" in a pair of test projects at the Cleveland and Akron, Ohio airports.

But EagleCheck isn't limiting its marketing plan to airport security. "We are certainly looking at a variety of other applications other than airports," said Akers, listing bars, banks, government buildings--in short, wherever ID is required--as possible customers.

If EagleCheck or a similar system succeeds, it raises the specter of something akin to a national identity card, a concept that Americans have shunned in the past but could return in a more high-tech form. (In a column last summer, I wrote about how the White House was pressuring state governments to move in this direction by standardizing on driver's licenses.)

Last week, Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., suggested that the United States might have to move toward a national identity card for U.S. citizens, according to a report at Newsmax.com. "Although I'm not a big fan of it, we might have to move toward an ID system even for citizens," Clinton said.

In the days after Sept. 11, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison began touting the idea. "The government could phase in digital ID cards to replace existing Social Security cards and driver's licenses," Ellison wrote in the Wall Street Journal. "These new IDs should be based on a uniform standard such as credit card technology, which is harder to counterfeit than existing government IDs, or on smart-card technology, which is better but more expensive."

If EagleCheck or a system like it succeeds, it becomes eerily possible to imagine a future in which ID readers are omnipresent, girding us in a constant mesh of surveillance.
National IDs come in many forms, and some are admittedly less invasive than others. According to Privacy International, other countries that do not have national identity cards include Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, and Sweden; those that do include Germany, France, Greece, Portugal and Spain.

Canada is considering following their lead. Denis Coderre, Canada's immigration minister, said this month that a card would reduce identity fraud by linking digitized fingerprints to a central database. (No wonder Canada's privacy commissioner, in his recent annual report, said: "We are on a path that may well lead to the permanent loss not only of privacy rights that we take for granted but also of important elements of freedom as we now know it.")

It's true that many of us already use our driver's license as a general form of identification. But a true national ID would be different in two important ways: First, it would be tied to a back-end database so all verifications would be logged with the time, date and location. Second, you likely would be required to show it on demand to police, shrinking our sphere of anonymity even more.

One problem with such a system is that it would not thwart terrorists who--if you believe the FBI--are already living in the United States and likely could obtain a valid identity card either legally or illegally. Administering such a database would require a massive bureaucracy, and the inevitable errors or glitches would eliminate an innocent person's freedom to travel from one place to another until they were corrected.

If EagleCheck or a system like it succeeds, it becomes eerily possible to imagine a future in which identity card readers are omnipresent, girding us in a constant mesh of surveillance. Want to pick up your car from the parking garage? Insert your identity card and forefinger in the reader first. Going to work at the office or coming home to an apartment building? Better make sure you have that microchipped card with you. Have any unpaid parking tickets anywhere in the United States? Better just stay at home.

Needless to say, this massive database would end up bursting with detailed records of all our life's activities. It would be incredibly valuable to police and create an irresistible temptation for misuse, either through corrupt officials or through electronic intrusions. I'm not saying that such a scenario is happening today. It isn't. But it's possible, and if there's another terrorist attack on the United States, all bets are off.

For now, the key question about EagleCheck is whether its records of our electronic comings-and-goings will be purged or stored. When used at airports, it makes sense to keep the information on hand for a day so--until planes safely land--before deleting it, but in other situations the justification for any data retention is much weaker.

The problem is that given such an informational gold mine, the FBI and the Justice Department won't let that happen. "We would have within the system the information that's in your ID and where and when it was swiped, what database it went to, and what response was delivered," Akers said. "From our perspective, as soon as 24 hours (elapse) after you get on the plane at Reagan National Airport or wherever, if we could purge that, we would like to. The question is how quickly are we legally allowed to purge that information. Ultimately we believe a legislative body and or a court is going to make that determination."

I trust Congress with my privacy. Don't you?

Declan McCullagh is the Washington correspondent for CNET News.com, chronicling the ever-busier intersection between technology and politics. Before that, he worked for several years as Washington bureau chief for Wired News. He has also worked as a reporter for The Netly News, Time magazine and HotWired.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-22-2003, 09:15 AM
CrimsonTide4 CrimsonTide4 is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 22,596
I mentioned this to my mom yesterday and she reminded me that we are already being "followed". . .

How many of us have VIP cards for various stores?
CVS
Food Lion
Giant Eagle
Big Bear
Kroger
Bi-Lo
Harris Teeter

etc. etc. etc. I always just thought of it being SAVINGS for me, but that is a way of them keeping track of everything we purchase.
__________________
I am a woman, I make mistakes. I make them often. God has given me a talent and that's it. ~ Jill Scott
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-22-2003, 06:02 PM
Ideal08 Ideal08 is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: In a whole 'nother world
Posts: 5,284
Quote:
Originally posted by CrimsonTide4
I mentioned this to my mom yesterday and she reminded me that we are already being "followed". . .

How many of us have VIP cards for various stores?
CVS
Food Lion
Giant Eagle
Big Bear
Kroger
Bi-Lo
Harris Teeter

etc. etc. etc. I always just thought of it being SAVINGS for me, but that is a way of them keeping track of everything we purchase.
I call them conspiracy cards.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-23-2003, 08:45 PM
33girl 33girl is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Hotel Oceanview
Posts: 33,513
Quote:
Originally posted by CrimsonTide4
I mentioned this to my mom yesterday and she reminded me that we are already being "followed". . .

How many of us have VIP cards for various stores?
CVS
Food Lion
Giant Eagle
Big Bear
Kroger
Bi-Lo
Harris Teeter

etc. etc. etc. I always just thought of it being SAVINGS for me, but that is a way of them keeping track of everything we purchase.
We actually had a semi-sarcastic article in the newsweekly here rating this and that..."Chance of Giant Eagle Advantage Card = Mark of the Beast - 6.5."

I refuse to get the CVS card no matter the savings because no one needs to keep track of, ummm, how many "feminine products" I buy.
__________________
It is all 33girl's fault. ~DrPhil
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-23-2003, 09:21 PM
RedefinedDiva RedefinedDiva is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: ATL/NOLA
Posts: 4,756
Quote:
Originally posted by 33girl
We actually had a semi-sarcastic article in the newsweekly here rating this and that..."Chance of Giant Eagle Advantage Card = Mark of the Beast - 6.5."

I refuse to get the CVS card no matter the savings because no one needs to keep track of, ummm, how many "feminine products" I buy.
I'm sorry, but I'll just have to be marked because without those cards, some of that isht is expensive as hell. Why would I pay $3.99 for something that I can get for $1.99 if I have the card? Either way it goes, privacy is hardly "private" anymore these days.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-03-2004, 08:04 PM
CrimsonTide4 CrimsonTide4 is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 22,596
This is supposed to be a joke, but I find it to be very prophetic

Operator: "Thank you for calling Pizza Hut. How May I serve you..."

Customer: "Hi, I'd like to order."

Operator: "May I have your NIDN first, sir?"

Customer: "My National ID Number, yeah, hold on, eh, it's 6102049998-45-54610."

Operator: "Thank you, Mr. Sheehan. I see you live at 1742 Meadowland Drive, and the phone number's 494-2366. Your office number over at Lincoln Insurance is 745-2302 and your cell number's 266-2566. Which number are you calling from, sir?"

Customer: "Huh? I'm at home. Where d'ya get all this information?"

Operator: "We're wired into the system, sir."

Customer: (Sighs) "Oh, well, I'd like to order a couple of your All-Meat Special pizzas..."

Operator: "I don't think that's a good idea, sir."

Customer: "Whaddya mean?"

Operator: "Sir, your medical records indicate that you've got very high blood pressure and extremely high cholesterol. Your National Health Care provider won't allow such an unhealthy choice."

Customer: "Damn. What do you recommend, then?"

Operator: "You might try our low-fat Soybean Yogurt Pizza. I'm sure you'll like it."

Customer: "What makes you think I'd like something like that?"

Operator: "Well, you checked out 'Gourmet Soybean Recipes' from your local library last week, sir. That's why I made the suggestion."

Customer: "All right, all right. Give me two family-sized ones, then. What's the damage?"

Operator: "That should be plenty for you, your wife and your four kids, sir. The 'damage,' as you put it, heh, heh, comes $49.99."

Customer: "Lemme give you my credit card number."

Operator: "I'm sorry sir, but I'm afraid you'll have to pay in cash. Your credit card balance is over its limit."

Customer: "I'll run over to the ATM and get some cash before your driver gets here."

Operator: "That won't work either, sir. Your checking account's overdrawn."

Customer: "Never mind. Just send the pizzas. I'll have the cash ready. How long will it take?"

Operator: "We're running a little behind, sir. It'll be about 45 minutes, sir. If you're in a hurry you might want to pick 'em up while you're out getting the cash, but carrying pizzas on a motorcycle can be a little awkward."

Customer: "How the hell do you know I'm riding a bike?"

Operator: "It says here you're in arrears on your car payments, so your car got repo'ed. But your Harley's paid up, so I just assumed that you'd be using it."

Customer: "@#%/$@&?#!"

Operator: "I'd advise watching your language, sir. You've already got a July 2002 conviction for cussing out a cop."

Customer: (Speechless)

Operator: "Will there be anything else, sir?"

Customer: "No, nothing. oh, yeah, don't forget the two free liters of Coke your ad says I get with the pizzas."

Operator: "I'm sorry sir, but our advert's exclusionary clause prevents us from offering free soda to diabetics.
__________________
I am a woman, I make mistakes. I make them often. God has given me a talent and that's it. ~ Jill Scott
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-03-2004, 08:39 PM
Honeykiss1974 Honeykiss1974 is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: ?
Posts: 5,888
It's already starting with people who enter the country (photo ID and fingerprints). Yeah, they say its to track people in the US with expired Visa's and such, but I'm sure soon it will be used to monitor US citizen. Maybe the next time to renew your driver's license.
__________________
"I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is to try to please everyone."
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-04-2004, 09:01 PM
Eclipse Eclipse is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,931
Re: This is supposed to be a joke, but I find it to be very prophetic

Quote:
Originally posted by CrimsonTide4
Operator: "Thank you for calling Pizza Hut. How May I serve you..."

Customer: "Hi, I'd like to order."

Operator: "May I have your NIDN first, sir?"

Customer: "My National ID Number, yeah, hold on, eh, it's 6102049998-45-54610."

awwwwww D@MN!!!

Anybody read the "Left Behind" series?!?!?!

I have a friend who just told me that she signs up for the "discount cards" at various places, but she never ever gives them the correct information. She makes up a name, address, SS# (if they require it) etc. every time for this very reason!!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-04-2004, 09:56 PM
Wonderful1908 Wonderful1908 is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: On a way to a breakthrough!!!
Posts: 1,580
Send a message via AIM to Wonderful1908
Quote:
Originally posted by RedefinedDiva
I'm sorry, but I'll just have to be marked because without those cards, some of that isht is expensive as hell. Why would I pay $3.99 for something that I can get for $1.99 if I have the card? Either way it goes, privacy is hardly "private" anymore these days.
Okay, cause I just saved $4.91 using my Kroger plus card. I don't get all pumped up with "conspiracies" and discount cards. Bottom line if you live a right life. Salvation is promised. Bottom line. Nuff said.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-04-2004, 10:04 PM
Eclipse Eclipse is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,931
Quote:
Originally posted by Wonderful1908
Bottom line if you live a right life. Salvation is promised. Bottom line. Nuff said.
[hijack] Sorry I gotta disagree with this one. I know not everyone on here is a Christian, but I thought I remember reading that you were. According to most orthodox (read mainstream) Christian Protestant beliefs, salvation is promised because of belief in and confession to Jesus Christ--nothing more, nothing less. Has absolutely nothing to do with living a "right life".

Romans 10:9
That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.

Ephesians 2:8-9
For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:
Not of works, lest any man should boast.

[/hijack]
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-05-2004, 12:54 PM
Wonderful1908 Wonderful1908 is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: On a way to a breakthrough!!!
Posts: 1,580
Send a message via AIM to Wonderful1908
Quote:
Originally posted by Eclipse
[hijack] Sorry I gotta disagree with this one. I know not everyone on here is a Christian, but I thought I remember reading that you were. According to most orthodox (read mainstream) Christian Protestant beliefs, salvation is promised because of belief in and confession to Jesus Christ--nothing more, nothing less. Has absolutely nothing to do with living a "right life".

Romans 10:9
That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.

Ephesians 2:8-9
For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:
Not of works, lest any man should boast.

[/hijack]
You misunderstood my meaning of a "right" life. I assumed that most Christians would understand "right" meaning living the correct components of Christianity and following the instructions in the Bible. I am happy to clarify though.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-01-2006, 04:49 AM
Rain Man Rain Man is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Studio 33 (aka The Bob Barker Studio), CBS Television City
Posts: 1,608
ttt - Old article, same issue(s)

This article is almost 4 years old, but still worthy of reading:

Under Your Skin Computer Chip Has Now Arrived

Related Article: Why You Should Get A Chip Implant

A Florida technology company is poised to ask the government for permission to market a first-ever computer ID chip that could be embedded beneath a person's skin.

Applied Digital Solutions' new "Verichip," about the size of a grain of rice, is the first computer ID chip that can be embedded beneath the skin.

For airports, nuclear power plants and other high security facilities, the immediate benefits could be a closer-to-foolproof security system. But privacy advocates warn the chip could lead to encroachments on civil liberties.

The implant technology is another case of science fiction evolving into fact. Those who have long advanced the idea of implant chips say it could someday mean no more easy-to-counterfeit ID cards nor dozing security guards.

Just a computer chip - about the size of a grain of rice - that would be difficult to remove and tough to mimic.

Other uses of the technology on the horizon, from an added device that would allow satellite tracking of an individual's every movement to the storage of sensitive data like medical records, are already attracting interest across the globe for tasks like foiling kidnappings or assisting paramedics.

Applied Digital Solutions' new "VeriChip" is another sign that Sept. 11 has catapulted the science of security into a realm with uncharted possibilities - and also new fears for privacy.

"The problem is that you always have to think about what the device will be used for tomorrow," said Lee Tien, a senior attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a privacy advocacy group.

"It's what we call function creep. At first a device is used for applications we all agree are good but then it slowly is used for more than it was intended," he said.

Applied Digital, based in Palm Beach, Fla., says it will soon begin the process of getting Food and Drug Administration approval for the device, and intends to limit its marketing to companies that ensure its human use is voluntary.

"The line in the sand that we draw is that the use of the VeriChip would always be voluntarily," said Keith Bolton, chief technology officer and a vice president at Applied Digital. "We would never provide it to a company that intended to coerce people to use it."

More than a decade ago, Applied bought a competing firm, Destron Fearing, which had been making chips implanted in animals for several years. Those chips were mainly bought by animal owners wanting to provide another way for pound workers to identify a lost pet.

Chips for Humans Aren't That Much Different

But the company was hesitant to market them for people because of ethical questions. The devastation of Sept. 11 solidified the company's resolve to market the human chip and brought about a new sensibility about the possible interest.

"It's a sad time ... when people have to wonder whether it's safe in their own country," Bolton said.

The makers of the chip also foresee it being used to help emergency workers diagnose a lost Alzheimer's patient or access an unconscious patient's medical history.

Getting the implant would go something like this:

A person or company buys the chip from Applied Digital for about $200 and the company encodes it with the desired information. The person seeking the implant takes the tiny device - about the size of a grain of rice, to their doctor, who can insert it with a large needle device.

The doctor monitors the device for several weeks to make sure it doesn't move and that no infection develops.

The device has no power supply, rather it contains a millimeter-long magnetic coil that is activated when a scanning device is run across the skin above it. A tiny transmitter on the chip sends out the data.

Without a scanner, the chip cannot be read.

Applied Digital plans to give away chip readers to hospitals and ambulance companies, in the hopes they'll become standard equipment.

The chip has drawn attention from several religious groups.

Theologian and author Terry Cook said he worries the identification chip could be the "mark of the beast," an identifying mark that all people will be forced to wear just before the end times, according to the Bible.

Applied Digital has consulted theologians and appeared on the religious television program the "700 Club" to assure viewers the chip didn't fit the biblical description of the mark because it is under the skin and hidden from view.

Even with the privacy and religious concerns, some are already eager to use the product.

Jeff Jacobs in Coral Springs, Florida has contacted the company in hopes of becoming the first person to purchase the chip.

Jacobs suffers from a number of serious allergies and wants to make sure medical personnel can diagnose him.

"They would know who to contact, they would know what medications I'm on, and it's quite a few," he said. "They would know what I'm allergic to, what kind of operations I've had and where there might be problems."

Applied Digital says technology to let the chip to be used for tracking is already well under development.

Eight Latin American companies have contacted Applied Digital and have openly encouraged the company to pursue the internal tracking devices. In some countries, kidnapping has become an epidemic that limits tourism and business.

Applied Digital Solutions' new "Verichip," about the size of a grain of rice, is the first computer ID chip that can be embedded beneath the skin.

USA Today February 27, 2002
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-01-2006, 04:51 AM
Rain Man Rain Man is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Studio 33 (aka The Bob Barker Studio), CBS Television City
Posts: 1,608
The website of the company doing the chip implants...

...is called Applied Digital Solutions

Applied Digital Solutions Website
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-01-2006, 09:40 AM
Radiant_One Radiant_One is offline
GreekChat Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 98
Send a message via Yahoo to Radiant_One
At one point, I thought the MTA Metro Cards in NYC kept track of your whereabouts; I only use cash when purchasing these cards. Using a debit/credit card can give greater access to your whereabouts throughout the day.

Also, my job has a rewards savings card for their "gift shop". I guess they want to see how much "candy/sunchips" I purchase a day. Go figure?
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-01-2006, 11:15 AM
honeychile honeychile is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Counting my blessings!
Posts: 26,632
I do believe in the root of this thread, and think we'll see it in our lifetime, but I have to admit that I HATE it when a store clerk asks for my phone number when I check out. I give them the White House telephone number!
__________________
~*~ honeychile - ~ *~"ADPi until I die!"~*~
Proud to be a Macon Magnolia
"He who is not busy being born is busy dying." Bob Dylan
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:09 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.