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AngelPhiSig
06-22-2002, 12:30 AM
Okay I searched and didnt find anything so:

Did anyone's school have secret orgs for students, like sororities? I know that Ive read posts and people have mentioned that their grandmothers etc were part of them...

Any info?

Websites?

Help!

Luvnstuff
Alison

sigmagrrl
06-22-2002, 08:40 AM
I have no knowledge of any sort of societies. The only time I have heard of such things are on TV, like the episode that ran this past season on "Gilmore Girls"...

Kevin
06-22-2002, 09:41 AM
There have been threads on this but I don't remember what they were called. Keep searching though, they're out there.

twinstars
06-22-2002, 10:43 AM
My sorority's housemother was in a high school sorority (she's probably about 70 yrs old) and apparently there was a lot of hazing involved.

RosmaPomia
06-22-2002, 11:07 AM
My own personal experience was with a group called "Exchangettes." We did something that I guess was like Rush, had weekly meetings, activities, and did community service. It was a lot of fun :D

SATX*APhi
06-22-2002, 12:20 PM
I've posted this under High School Hazing, http://greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?s=&postid=205498, but here goes:


My H.S. hazing story


In high school there was something you could be initiated into, a secret society or underground sorority, if you will. You had to be "chosen" to join. The sophomores aka "Sophomore Misses" extend invitations to the freshman, juniors aka "Junior Ladies" extend to sophomores, and seniors aka "Senior Women" extend to juniors. You cannot join as a senior. If you were initiated as a freshman, you were initiated into Freshman Girls. Your sophomore year you were automatically a part of Sophomore Misses, etc.

I was initiated as a sophomore into Sophomore Misses. What the Junior Ladies did that year is get a list of all sophomores who were extended an invite to join. They assign to each Junior Lady 1 or 2 sophomores to pick up from their home before initiation. They drove us to someone's house where we all met. (There were tons of cars, mind you. The boys of the junior class came along to watch) Before getting to our meeting spot, some of the juniors took the sophomores that they had to go "shopping" for embarrassing items. The juniors could also have done stuff to them, such as making them wear their bras on the outside, etc. Luckily the junior who picked me up was super nice and did nothing to me prior to arriving at the meeting house. When we got to the meeting house, we were put into the back of pick-up trucks. Since the junior who picked me up drove a Mustang, I had to leave her since I would be getting dirty. The good thing is that I was put in the pick-up truck of the Junior Lady who had invited me to join, one of my good friends. She didn't make us do anything stupid, other than give her chihuahua dog a kiss! Most other sophomores there had lipstick put all over their face, Crisco in their hair, tampons hanging from their ears and tons of other things.

All pick-up trucks go to the same location, out in the middle of nowhere. They lay out a tarp on the ground and make us all lay next to each other, like sardines. They pour tons of junk all over us - eggs, flour, sardines, pickles, hot dogs, ketchup, mustard, peanut butter and tons of other junk. Some of the girls even had to pretend to be giving the junior guys oral pleasure. Fortunately, I was not! After all this is done, they drive us all to a car wash and spray us down. Then, they go and drop us off back home and afterwards there is a party.

FUNNY THING ABOUT JOINING:
We do nothing together after that! There was talk about having a party per semester. Yeah right! They did do football boosters my junior year. There were about 3 girls to each member on the 1st string football team. Before school on the day of each game the girls met with the guy and gave him treats. I didn't do this because I was in band and had a little sis to get things for every game. We were supposed to have a graduation party, yeah right! It was all a bunch of bull.

The ONE thing we did do: make t-shirts every year so that we could "represent."

Basically, you were initiated just to say that you were in Freshman Girls, Sophomore Misses, Junior Ladies or Senior Women. If you were initiated then you were part of the "popular" crowd.

SigKapSundevil
06-22-2002, 01:50 PM
That sounds exactly like the movie"Dazed and Confused."

SATX*APhi
06-22-2002, 05:22 PM
Originally posted by SigKapSundevil
That sounds exactly like the movie"Dazed and Confused."

My post?

SigKapSundevil
06-22-2002, 05:59 PM
Yes, your post is just like the movie. Have you ever seen it? The senior girls round up the "chosen" freshman and have all the guys around watching, and they put stuff all over them like you said (mustard, ketchup, etc) and then they made them pretend to do sexual favors for the guys too. They also put them into pickup trucks and ran them through the car wash. I am guessing whoever started that tradition at your school probably got some of that stuff based off the movie!!

dekeguy
06-22-2002, 07:26 PM
My Aunt told me that she was in a High School Sorority that was school sanctioned and very carefully monitored by the chapter advisors and the administration and served as a sort of feeder organization to the NPC houses at Newcomb College. Lots of fun but tightly controlled. Apparently there were a dozen or so of these sororities, but that the system was dieing out in the late 50s and was gone by the mid 60s. I asked some cousins down in New Orleans who told me that there used to be an extensive network of High School Fraternities and Sororities which were independent of college Greek organizations but did tend to feed into certain houses in the deep South at least. The Fraternities died out in the fifties and the sororities in the sixties and were replaced in New Orleans by a club called "Valencia" which had tennis courts, a swimming pool, a huge party room and club house facilities like a Country Club but limited to kids in high school! Valencia was a social club that might have been seen as basic training for college and Greek life but I think it was more than that.
One of my friends in Law School said that his mother belonged to a national highschool sorority called Chi Kappa Chi (XKX) when she was growing up in Hammond, Indiana. According to him, this was also tightly controlled by the administration at his Mom's school but that some other chapters or other houses were very much into hazing and serious drinking and this led to a law baning HS greek orgs in Indiana. We asked one of our Law profs who we knew to be Greek and he told us that he was aware of similar HS systems in Richmond and in Baltimore and that his father had been in a HS fraternity in St Louis before he went SAE at Missouri. He said that he was pretty sure they all died out about the same time as well. Sounds like in Louisiana they came up with an alternative social organization and in Indiana they shut them down by law. I don't know what happened elsewhere . This is all second hand info but I think its interesting that there was a whole HS level of National Greek Orgs that seem to have died out or gone into deep cover. Anybody know any info about this they can share?

SATX*APhi
06-22-2002, 08:22 PM
Originally posted by SigKapSundevil
Yes, your post is just like the movie. Have you ever seen it?

Never seen the movie. Maybe I should.

Senusret I
06-22-2002, 09:13 PM
My high school in Washington, DC, which was predominately black, has a local sorority called Cultured Pearls, which was established by an AKA on the administration. It seems to perform as a charm club. There is also mentoring. It wasn't founded until after I left, so the details are sketchy. Contact Christine Easterling at Calvin Coolidge High School in DC for more information.

chantillylace55
06-22-2002, 09:31 PM
There was a sorority at my mom's high school in So Cal. They were called the Denotians and you could only join if you were invited to... my mom was invited, but declined because she didn't want to be limited to one group of friends (they didnt talk to anyone outside of the Denotians)... She said they did silly things for the girls getting initiated (wearing pins, wearing clothes inside-out to school, getting them drunk), but that was about it. I'm not sure if it was designed to filter into the NPC system, but the majority of my mom's friends that were in it did end up going greek (I think a lot were USC Pi Phis)... that's about all I know:D

orchid2
07-06-2002, 12:33 AM
Hmmm... oh yes, they had them at my high school. There were four groups, each at its own level of eliteness, and you had to be asked in your 8th grade year.

They printed t-shirts for different events, did some community service, held formals and balls, an annual sisterhood retreat, a "greek week" of sorts, etc. The pledging process lasted an entire school year (rather than 6-8 weeks), and the girls would come to school and to football games in ridiculous costumes the week before initiation.

These groups have been in our town for generations and generations, and a lot of the girls end up going greek once they get to college. The high school sororities are sponsored by matronly "study clubs," which is probably my town's equivalent to a junior league.

ChiOJenn78
07-06-2002, 12:52 PM
My highschool didn't have hs sororities, but since it was an all-girls hs, I guess you could call us one big sorority :D We did have Big Sisters when we were freshman, and then when we were juniors we got Little Sisters. That was the closest thing we had. Anyhoo, I had never heard of sororities in high school until I moved down here to Galveston and they have 3 or 4 at the hs here. I think it's kind of silly, personally, to have a sorority in hs.

Funny story-I was taking a dress to get altered because I was coming back for one of Mr.ChiOJenn's formals and the lady doing the alterations was asking me what it was for, and I told her a fraternity formal. She was like, oh, what sorority are you in? Is it blah blah blah(started naming off the hs sorority names)-I was like, um NO. Do I still look like I'm in hs?? :rolleyes: Anyhoo....

bro_strawter
07-06-2002, 04:43 PM
We had Gamma Delta (band), Delta Tau Love (Band) and Gentry Phi Perfection, or G Phi P(Social) at my high school in Detroit.

Pi Kapp 142
07-06-2002, 06:09 PM
My friends and I had something like this in HS. We called it Hotel California (we were big into the eagles back then). We did not really think of ourselves as a fraternity, we just wanted to have a group of friends that agreed that there was a better way of being friends than just womenizing and being dicks to each other. We had a few rules and even had a few meeting and what not over the course of HS but it was mostly to agree on how we were going to have a party or something. WHat was really cool was that we had a whole big garage that wsa our clubhouse pretty much that we could have all kinds of functions at, Now that it has been a few years since leaving HS, almost all of my friends are part of a fraternity, usually in a leadership position, and very successful chapters at that.

Krisber81
07-06-2002, 06:52 PM
My High School and surronding high schools used to have sororities and fraternities but, MA educational board deleted them from all public schools, saying they harm the effect of education. That was back in the late 70's they did that. Now some schools still have them but they are known as something else...such as the Girls philantropic club

~Kristen

TPARose
07-07-2002, 10:31 AM
My mother was a part of a high school sorority in her upstate New York School. They were called that "Epsilon Zetas" or the "Ezees" (HAa!) My mother moved to her school rather late so she "pledged" the sorority as a Senior, which normally wasnt allowed, but all of her friends were Ezees, so they made an exception. Although the rest of the younger girls had to do much more, the only thing that my mom had to do was write "E" on one cheek and "Z" on the other and walk around school"

When I found this out, I rolled around the floor crying with laughter, because I never thought that my mom was the type.. But now I know a lot more about my mom, so I know better :)

ADPiPrincess
07-07-2002, 11:43 AM
There were three "secret societies" at my High school for girls and three for boys. There were always 12 girls in mine, and my mother was also in the society that I was in. We were not allowed to tell anyone that we were in the society, and we were allowed to hang out with anyone that we wished, but our loyalty fell in with those other 11 girls. It was a great experience, and I wouldn't have changed it for the world. I guess I should have known that I would go from one HS secret society into the First and Finest in the world! :) Love to all my ADPi sisters and everyone else!

Tonii-Tee
05-03-2007, 10:41 AM
i AM NOW iN A HiGH SCHOOL SORORiTY [ALPHA THETA NU CHRiSTiAN COMMUNiTY SERViCE SORORiTY. i AM THE PRESiDENT!..

AlphaFrog
05-03-2007, 10:59 AM
i AM NOW iN A HiGH SCHOOL SORORiTY [ALPHA THETA NU CHRiSTiAN COMMUNiTY SERViCE SORORiTY. i AM THE PRESiDENT!..

LiKe, OmG? FoR sUre? rElLy??

Drolefille
05-03-2007, 11:50 AM
LiKe, OmG? FoR sUre? rElLy??
Why all the lowercase I's is what I want to know. It's not like she just left the capslock on and "oopsed" but she lowercased the I's in Christian too.

risingstar
05-03-2007, 11:53 AM
My high school has several sororities. A lot of the schools in my area have them. That is all.

MysticCat
05-03-2007, 01:25 PM
Why all the lowercase I's is what I want to know. It's not like she just left the capslock on and "oopsed" but she lowercased the I's in Christian too.BECAUSE i AM NOT THE CENTER OF THE WORLD? :rolleyes:

AlphaFrog
05-03-2007, 01:30 PM
BECAUSE i AM NOT THE CENTER OF THE WORLD? :rolleyes:

You need to get in the corner.
Nose to the wall.:p

NightmareQue
05-03-2007, 01:32 PM
I've never heard of a high school sorrority! That's fake!

Drolefille
05-03-2007, 01:39 PM
I've never heard of a high school sorrority! That's fake!
Sadly it is not.

My mom was actually in one in high school. There were three or four public high schools and one Catholic school in the area. There were three HS sororities that were loosely tied to specific schools. It was... special... from the sound of it

Drolefille
05-03-2007, 01:39 PM
BECAUSE i AM NOT THE CENTER OF THE WORLD? :rolleyes:
When are you getting your account back?

AlphaFrog
05-03-2007, 01:40 PM
I've never heard of a high school sorrority! That's fake!

I've never heard of a sorrority either.;)

MysticCat
05-03-2007, 01:41 PM
When are you getting your account back?Your guess is as good as mine.

I've never heard of a sorrority either.;)Well, if you haven't heard of them, then they must be fake.

AlphaFrog
05-03-2007, 01:43 PM
Well, if you haven't heard of them, then they must be fake.

I'm glad someone on here recognizes my omniscience.;) :p

Elephant Walk
05-03-2007, 02:00 PM
Definitely had them. One white sorority (Delta Beta Sigma), it seemed like they had alot of fun. And a black fraternity, all I know is they went by the Beta's. From my limited knowledge, it seemed like Arkansas had alot of chapters of DBS.

tld221
05-03-2007, 03:47 PM
BECAUSE i AM NOT THE CENTER OF THE WORLD? :rolleyes:

You need to get in the corner.
Nose to the wall.:p

LOL LiKE, THAT WOULDVE BEEN MY ANSWER CAUSE THE SORORiTiE COMES BEFORE i DO! THERES NO i iN SORORiTie...

(oh damn, there's 2... shyte... now what?)

JWithers
05-03-2007, 10:47 PM
In my HS we had service organizations like Anchor Club and Key Club, which are (I assume) off-shoots of GLOs. I know in Anchor we had a ritual initiation and were very selective about whom we invited to join. GPA and extra-curricular were taken into consideration also. We had interviews with alums and had to write an essay.

I went to a college with no GLOs but transferred to a larger U and then for post-grad and was always interested in college sororities. A colleague of mine in grad school told me to ask about post-grad recruitment (she said 'rush' was verboten)? I never heard of that. Is it a real thing? I won't reveal the org. in case it's wrong info. But I love the histories behind your orgs. and think it's a really interesting concept.

I especially love the symbolism behind the flowers and colors. I love the book by Geri Laufer "Tussie Mussies" which reveals the medieval and rennaissance meanings behind many different flowers and how the combinations of these flowers contained hidden meanings.

Pike_Cardinal
05-03-2007, 11:09 PM
We didn't have greek organizations at my HS, and I'm sure it's rather unheard of in Ky period. Although, I do know a girl who said there was one sorority in her HS. I don't think I like the idea of it. There being one organization, which was apparently elitist, negatively skewed her opinion of greek life.

fantASTic
05-04-2007, 12:14 AM
I can't think that high school GLO's are a good idea. Kids in high school are too judgemental and elitist as it is; do we REALLY need to give them a reason to behave poorly to others? No; no is the answer to that question.

Xidelt
05-04-2007, 12:29 AM
In my HS we had service organizations like Anchor Club and Key Club, which are (I assume) off-shoots of GLOs. I know in Anchor we had a ritual initiation and were very selective about whom we invited to join. GPA and extra-curricular were taken into consideration also. We had interviews with alums and had to write an essay.

I went to a college with no GLOs but went to a larger U for post-grad and was always interested in college sororities. A colleague of mine in grad school told me to ask about post-grad recruitment (she said 'rush' was verboten)? I never heard of that. Is it a real thing? I won't reveal the org. in case it's wrong info. But I love the histories behind your orgs. and think it's a really interesting concept.

I especially love the symbolism behind the flowers and colors. I love the book by Geri Laufer "Tussie Mussies" which reveals the medieval and rennaissance meanings behind many different flowers and how the combinations of these flowers contained hidden meanings.

Key Club and many of those high school service clubs are sponsored by civic clubs like the Kiwanis Int or Rotary Clubs. They also have college level equivalents so students can continue their involvement. At the college and university level, Key Club is known as Circle K.

There are also opportunities to be involved in sororities outside of college. NPC sororities are not the only type. Community sororities also offer sisterhood, ritual, and symbolism and have social and philanthropic activities. They just don't happen to be affiliated with a college. Examples are Beta Sigma Phi or Epsilon Sigma Alpha. Google the term "community sororities" and you should get several results.

bejazd
05-04-2007, 01:58 PM
I belonged to a high school "sorority" in Southern California. We called them "off campus" clubs. My mother belonged to a similar group at North Hollywood HS in the 50's. aside from the social aspect, they were not really sororities. I believe these clubs were off shoots from when the YMCA sponsored activities like dances and pep rallies at high schools in the 50s. I don't know if they exist anymore as I don't live in the area now...the schools generally frowned upon the whole thing as they viewed it the same thing as a gang, and there was no control by the school.

interestingly enough, these clubs were not elitist at all. Friendly rivalry would be a better description. It was the Key Club that was elitist, because it had to sponsored by a teacher, and therefore the membership was limited to 30...at a school with over 3000 students! There was a lot of sucking up involved in getting in the Key Club!

JWithers
05-04-2007, 04:19 PM
Key Club and many of those high school service clubs are sponsored by civic clubs like the Kiwanis Int or Rotary Clubs. They also have college level equivalents so students can continue their involvement. At the college and university level, Key Club is known as Circle K.

There are also opportunities to be involved in sororities outside of college. NPC sororities are not the only type. Community sororities also offer sisterhood, ritual, and symbolism and have social and philanthropic activities. They just don't happen to be affiliated with a college. Examples are Beta Sigma Phi or Epsilon Sigma Alpha. Google the term "community sororities" and you should get several results.


That is really interesting! Thanks. I am out of school now, but it is still a fact I will bet many people don't know. :)

REE1993
05-04-2007, 06:53 PM
Being geeky Catholic school kids, the club to be in was a certain church's Youth Group. My high school had kids from about 10 nearby towns. The church's youth group was comprised of kids from our co-ed high school which was one town over from the Church, the boy's prep school two towns away, and a small girls' prep school 4 towns away.

Many of us from other towns left our home churches and joined this particular town's parish (as official adult roster members who contributed weekly to the collection plate and such), simply to become a member of their youth group. (Most towns only had one or two Catholic Churches). We sang in the choir, ran Emmaus retreats, held dances every month, held service events every month, free coffee and donuts after mass every Sunday...etc. There was actually a waiting list to get into the group because it became so large. Eventually, we had to split some events and meetings by grade (frosh/soph and junior/senior).

One of our coolest endeavors was an offshoot into the hunger prevention movement in the 80s. Our group, Youth Ending Hunger, encompassed students from all over the country, and culminated yearly with an invitation-only visit and presentation to ambassadors from over 75 countries at the UN. We held fundraisers, awareness events, and participated in conference calls weekly.

To be a member of this youth group was well-known enough in the state that many recruiters of local colleges knew of it. Kids from every typical HS cliques - jocks/cheerleaders; theatre/choir; honors track; the rockers/goth/burnout crew; math and science wizzes; foreign language and culture group - were represented in the Youth Group.

So, no Sorority or Fraternity, but definitely a group that "who you knew" made you more likely to be socially accepted within the group, which meant that you hung out together outside the official events. Also, there were a few invitation- or by-application and selection-only leadership opportunities and programs that we all worked hard to be chosen to attend.

We were by no means the "popular kids" but usually the kids who ran a lot of committees, volunteered, and the kids who other kids' parents would trust their children to hang with. (Drinking and smoking were prohibited at all events, and discouraged at home parties). All official business was conducted with adult supervision and for liability reasons.

I guess it was a great preparation and segue into Gamma Sigma Sigma.

Anyway, that's my story.

ms_gwyn
05-05-2007, 04:13 PM
I belonged to a high school "sorority" in Southern California. We called them "off campus" clubs. My mother belonged to a similar group at North Hollywood HS in the 50's. aside from the social aspect, they were not really sororities. I believe these clubs were off shoots from when the YMCA sponsored activities like dances and pep rallies at high schools in the 50s. I don't know if they exist anymore as I don't live in the area now...the schools generally frowned upon the whole thing as they viewed it the same thing as a gang, and there was no control by the school.

interestingly enough, these clubs were not elitist at all. Friendly rivalry would be a better description. It was the Key Club that was elitist, because it had to sponsored by a teacher, and therefore the membership was limited to 30...at a school with over 3000 students! There was a lot of sucking up involved in getting in the Key Club!

WOW

This sounds like my High School and the Tri-Hi-Y clubs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alhambra_High_School#Tri-Hi-Y_clubs) my sister was a founding member of Le Aikanes and I was a member of Lanakila. They were not sororities but sorority-like.

Gwyn

MTSUGURL
05-05-2007, 04:36 PM
There are two highschools sororities here that I know of - Delta Beta Sigma and Alpha Delta Kappa. The ADKs used to make their pledges walk around in these gingham aprons and bows... I had heard that they tended to become AOIIs. We didn't have sororities at my highschool, but there was a fraternity - I don't remember what they were called.

Unregistered-
05-05-2007, 04:37 PM
WOW

This sounds like my High School and the Tri-Hi-Y clubs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alhambra_High_School#Tri-Hi-Y_clubs) my sister was a founding member of Le Aikanes and I was a member of Lanakila. They were not sororities but sorority-like.

Gwyn

[/off topic]

How did the ones with the Hawaiian names come to get their names? And WTF is "Le Aikane"? Is it French? Is it Hawaiian? I only ask because the kaona (deeper meaning) of "Aikane" is gay male partner. :eek: Na Ali`i? The Chiefs? Laule`a = glad/happy? There was a singing group here called Hui Ohana in the 1970s so it's kinda weird to see it the other way around. And ironically my outrigger paddling club is called Hui Lanakila.

I'm curious to learn more about their foundings, even more so how they became labeled as such. Does Alhambra have a large Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian population or did somebody think that it was just cool to give these clubs a Hawaiian name?

ms_gwyn
05-05-2007, 05:27 PM
[/off topic]

How did the ones with the Hawaiian names come to get their names? And WTF is "Le Aikane"? Is it French? Is it Hawaiian? I only ask because the kaona (deeper meaning) of "Aikane" is gay male partner. :eek: Na Ali`i? The Chiefs? Laule`a = glad/happy? There was a singing group here called Hui Ohana in the 1970s so it's kinda weird to see it the other way around. And ironically my outrigger paddling club is called Hui Lanakila.

I'm curious to learn more about their foundings, even more so how they became labeled as such. Does Alhambra have a large Hawaiian/part-Hawaiian population or did somebody think that it was just cool to give these clubs a Hawaiian name?

OTW

I was always under the impression that Le Aikanes meant Friends...I would ask my sister but we don't talk...we haven't for over 10 years....

The groups were founded in the 50/60s..Cheryl Tiegs was a member of Na Al'ii, my thinking is when there were founded based on Polynesian pop culture that was popular during the time, I know this sounds bad, as a Greek and all, but it has been almost 20 years, since I was out of High School, my memory is very faulty during that time period. A lot of the groups that were on campus when I was there are gone and a few new ones have formed....Most were of Hawaiian themed, except for Les Petites Amies which is French and stands for The Little Friends.

Unregistered-
05-05-2007, 05:38 PM
OTW

I was always under the impression that Le Aikanes meant Friends...I would ask my sister but we don't talk...we haven't for over 10 years....

The groups were founded in the 50/60s..Cheryl Tiegs was a member of Na Al'ii, my thinking is when there were founded based on Polynesian pop culture that was popular during the time, I know this sounds bad, as a Greek and all, but it has been almost 20 years, since I was out of High School, my memory is very faulty during that time period. A lot of the groups that were on campus when I was there are gone and a few new ones have formed....Most were of Hawaiian themed, except for Les Petites Amies which is French and stands for The Little Friends.

Interesting.

The Hawaiian language can get tricky at times because words have literal and figurative meanings. If you're trying to say "The Friends" it would be more proper to say "Na Hoa" or "Na Hoaloha" instead of "`Aikane" because of the above mentioned deeper meaning. `Ai=Eat; Kane=Man. You get the idea. It can mean friend, but it is very rarely used.

Is the ' in Al`ii intentional? The `okina (glottal stop) belongs between the two i.

Based on what I've heard about Polynesian pop culture in the 50s/60s I can see how lots of people would be quick to jump on the Hawaiian bandwagon. I suppose we can thank Don Ho for that (RIP, Don). The Hawaiian "Renaissance" didn't happen here till the mid-70s and it was then that more and more people were eager to learn the language.

I learn something new everyday!

Tonii-Tee
05-11-2007, 02:20 PM
LiKe, OmG? FoR sUre? rElLy??

YES!:)

SydneyK
05-11-2007, 03:01 PM
We didn't have greek organizations at my HS, and I'm sure it's rather unheard of in Ky period.

I knew a girl in college who had gone to HS in Louisville KY, and she talked about being in a sorority in high school. She talked about it during rush, and I remember that a lot of us stood around her and listened to her stories during one of our rush parties (looking back, I wonder what all the other rushees were doing!). She had some pretty interesting things to say. She didn't go KD, or I'd probably have heard more stories. I'd like to hear what her college experiences were like compared to her HS sorority experiences.

Anyway, maybe it's only common in the bigger cities. Or maybe it's unheard of now (she talked about it when she was a freshman in college, in the early 90's).

_Lisa_
05-11-2007, 03:15 PM
We didn't have greek organizations at my HS, and I'm sure it's rather unheard of in Ky period.

Its not unheard of in Lexington, they've got Reveler. And from what I hear, its still going strong!

Senusret I
08-02-2007, 06:02 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShNmeH5xsJw

A high school sorority probate.

:confused::(:mad:

rhoyaltempest
08-02-2007, 06:23 PM
^^^^I see they've been watching youtube!!!!!!!!!:eek:

kathykd2005
08-02-2007, 06:24 PM
I had a sorority sister in college who was in a high school sorority. They even had a form of recruitment where they came to the girl's HOUSE and decorated her room in order to try and outdo the other high school sororities. She is from Birmingham, Alabama, so I'm sure there are other high school sororities throughout the south, as well.

ccccccc
08-07-2007, 03:11 AM
Many prep schools in the US and UK function under a "house system," which is, in many respects, similar to the Greek system. Houses have intramural athletic competitions, students live in their houses, there are house colors, flags, and insignia, and there is generally some form of initiation. A housemaster lives with the students and is available to lend a helping hand. However, rather than voluntarily join, students are automatically placed in a house. The placement is based first upon legacy, and then by personality. Houses also compete for the highest GPA. Many houses have strong traditions and members take great pride in being associated with a house. Depending on the school, the bonds formed in a house can be of minimal importance, only impacting living accomodations, or they can define a student's experience at their prep school. Though such prep schools don't fall directly under the category of "high schools," the students are of the same age and are exposed to a Greek-style system before university.

couggirl
08-07-2007, 04:01 AM
so, kinda of like the houses in Harry Potter?

RutgersPIKE
08-07-2007, 05:29 AM
so, kinda of like the houses in Harry Potter?



Thats exactly what I was thinking haha

CuriousWildcat
08-07-2007, 08:25 AM
A friend of mine was in a HS sorority. It was Tri-Alpha. She told me that they all had to where a shirt that said Alpha Alpha Alpha Plegde, for a week straight and they had to get all of the older girls signature but couldn't ask if they were in it or something.

Infamous12
08-07-2007, 09:37 AM
I was in a sorority group for high schoolers called Xinos, under the advising of the National Sorority of Phi Delta Kappa: A national teaching sorority. There was a group for guys too called Kudos. We actually did some sort of initiation process, and then after 'crossing';) had regular meetings, did TONS of community service, had a debuntante-esque ball and went to a regional conference with other Xinos & Kudos in the Midwest.:cool: Looking back, it was similar to collegiate greekdom in those aspects.

Sidenote: The Xinos hand sign was an upside down triangle.....*nervous laugh* the Kudos did a right side up triangle....not as crisp but very similar to...yeah. *nervous laugh*

LOL.

Senusret I
08-07-2007, 09:43 AM
I had a friend in high school who was a Xino. They stepped, too. I dunno, I kinda like what they're about.

Infamous12
08-07-2007, 09:46 AM
Oh yeah, we stepped too. I remember a few years ago it was found out that I was a past Xino, so I was asked to do a step from a Xino step show. This particular step ended with "All of my love...my peace and happiness...I'm going to give it to Xinos"


:o:( LOL.

Senusret I
08-07-2007, 09:50 AM
LOL it's okay, you didn't know better. :)

At least Xinos are actually legit, have a national parent body, go to conferences, etc. It's sorta like Jack & Jill but more accessible.

rhoyaltempest
08-07-2007, 03:44 PM
I think it's different if you are under the advisement of a national sorority or fraternity and DO NOT consider yourself in a sorority or fraternity. We have the Rhoer Club and Rhoers know that they are not in a sorority, but rather in a sisterly club for high school girls. They step, do community service, go to conferences, etc. but must keep their grades up to continue to participate.

IMO, sorority/fraternity membership should be reserved for college students. High school groups should not try to mimic national organizations. This also takes away from the prestige of pursuing a sorority or fraternity at the college level and can make high schoolers misinformed and unappreciative of the "real" experience and lifetime commitment that college organizations require. Scholarship should be their main focus anyway, not trying to be in a sorority or fraternity.

LatinaAlumna
08-11-2007, 11:44 AM
OTW

I was always under the impression that Le Aikanes meant Friends...I would ask my sister but we don't talk...we haven't for over 10 years....

The groups were founded in the 50/60s..Cheryl Tiegs was a member of Na Al'ii, my thinking is when there were founded based on Polynesian pop culture that was popular during the time, I know this sounds bad, as a Greek and all, but it has been almost 20 years, since I was out of High School, my memory is very faulty during that time period. A lot of the groups that were on campus when I was there are gone and a few new ones have formed....Most were of Hawaiian themed, except for Les Petites Amies which is French and stands for The Little Friends.

Ms_Gwyn, you are from Alhambra? One of my sorority sisters went to HS in Alhambra, and was a member of one of these groups (although I can't remember the name). I do remember her saying there was a group for boys called "Le Frat". This was back in the early 90s.

sororitygirl93
09-06-2007, 01:06 AM
I went to HS in Indianapolis in the 90's. There were several HS sororities in the area that had been around since my mom's HS days or longer. One was called "Euvola", and another called "Sub Deb." My HS administration HATED it. They both hazed a ton. I remember everyone talking the day that they had to wear horrid ugly clothes with no makeup - it was an annual event.

AnchorAlumna
09-06-2007, 01:16 AM
My high school had 3 sororities when I was there...of course my parents weren't country club members so I wasn't invited to any of them! My daughter later became a member of 1 of them. By then 1 was gone, only 2 left. There was a fraternity when I was in school, but most of the members were in Key Club and it actually functioned as a fraternity. Now boys AND girls belong to Key Club. Back in the day, if you got IN a sorority you certainly never quit...when daughter was a member, seniors became alums after the winter formal...but there were usually just a handful of seniors, most had quit by then.
And...
There was a high school sorority named Delta Gamma, with several chapters. Apparently it came along AFTER Delta Gamma (the NPC group) was founded. Occasionally their yearbooks or composites crop up on eBay.

justabeachbrat
09-06-2007, 02:40 AM
My high school didn't have sororities, but did have girls clubs that ruled the school. Oddly, they were run by Y. There were several of these clubs, and each group had a sweater, a section of the lunch area carved out that one did not cross unless being a member, and a pecking order, from the best to the not-so-hot groups. There was a form of rush, with membership gained only by being voted in and what would be considered hazing. I was a "legacy" of a group my older sister was in before she graduated. Being in my "blimp" stage at the time, I was told by the members that this was the only reason I was allowed to join. I quit, leaving the dear girls.
After high school, I went to junior college, then tranferred to the nearby state college which had an active Greek system. Once on campus, it felt as if my high school had followed me there. Girls from those "in" high school clubs were ruling the top houses, and I avoided those houses, it was too weird.
The high school seemed to have no control over these groups. My mother, who can be a crusader, was very upset about the hold the clubs had on the high school and tried through the board of education to get them tossed off campus. This was in my sister's freshman year. My sister had her back off when word went around school that my sister would be a social outcast if my mother continued to rock the boat. Much to my mother's dismay, my sister joined a club the following year. It was basically understood that if you wanted to date the cute guys--jocks, student leaders, etc., you gained membership into one of these clubs, and the hotter the girls, the better.
I have no idea if the school still allows the clubs, I hope not.

ZTA72
09-06-2007, 09:40 AM
I'm from the suburban Nashville area and years ago, hahaha, when I went to high school there were numerous sororities and fraternities. We went to rush parties and if memory serves, we got our invites in the mail...I still have mine.
We did " community service" had car washes, meetings, and formals at the area country clubs.
It was a good experience for me and almost every girl who really wanted a bid received one.
I do know that at least one of the groups is still around today.
ZTA72

ealymc
09-06-2007, 01:00 PM
Delta Beta Sigma, I think, is one of the h.s. sororities at Conway High School

barnard1897
09-15-2007, 01:25 AM
Long post, but for those who are interested--

During HS, I belonged to Delta Beta Sigma in my city (deep south). The chapter had primarily members from my public high school but also a few girls from neighboring, wealthy private schools. It was very similar to an NPC group in many ways and I wouldn't be at all shocked if it was a feeder into some of the NPC groups at schools like Ole Miss, LSU, and such, because we really did a lot of the same kinds of activities and most of the women who pledged DBS went on to pledge sororities in college. It was not associated with the HS officially--just a lot of us happened to be members. I think we were asked to wear our pledge pins at school.

Our colors were black and gold. There was a crest, pledge pin, and badge. There was a rush period, held over the course of a few days at different members' homes, with themes, nametags, and refreshments. Bids were extended--it was so exciting because they came to your house, rang the doorbell, and when the door opened, 25-50 screaming girls--the cutest and most popular ones-- chanted, sang, and then asked you to join, followed by lots more screams and hugs when you (of course) accepted. It was very thrilling to be extended a bid, much like the feeling you have on bid day in college.

We had a manual to study, pledge meetings, and we had tests, just like the mem ed tests we took for my NPC sorority. There was ritual for pledging if I recall, and definitely an initiation ceremony, which was a mixture of some silly stuff like blindfolds, but also some typical sorority ritual aspects. I can't recall if there was an official philanthropy. The sorority had a long history dating back to the 1800s and there were founders and all the usual stuff you have to memorize. We had to write from memory the creed of the sorority for one exam. We were on watch by actives all the time during our pledge term, and they could issue demerits for behavior unbecoming a DBS member, if we were caught without the pledge pin, or if we could not recite facts about the sorority when asked.

We had a big sister program. There was a very exciting reveal for that, I clearly recall. I had a really popular, pretty senior as my big sis, and I just thought she was fabulous. She's off in Hollywood now!

DBS had a national HQ, even, somewhere in the deep south. I know for certain there were other chapters. One girl had actually affiliated with our chapter from one in another city when she moved into our town. They had national conventions, just like NPC groups do, though not on the same scale!

The women in my chapter were no different from the ones in college sororities. Some nice, some mature, some not. There were cliques within, and of course, some of the usual cattiness and power plays that pervade houses at the college level. Yet, I also met some very nice girls with whom I became close friends, and one of them is still my friend some 20+ years later.

I do not think such a system could have lasted into the 90s in non southern locales--it is amazing to hear it's still around. It was quite firmly rooted in the kind of Southern tradition that just would not have survived in northern cities. We had fun times, for the most part. My mom and dad, total non Greeks, thought the whole thing was frivolous and a waste of money (oh yeah-we paid national dues too). But I bet now, seeing what a loyal alum I am for my college sorority, they would think differently.

If nothing else, this experience was great training for recruitment and pledging once I got to college. I was prepared for rushing. I knew what to expect during the pledge program and didn't complain when we had to memorize all those historical facts about founders, etc. I understood what it meant to have chapter meetings and parliamentary procedure, elections, etc. I didn't know many of the girls when I joined, and so it was while before I learned to be confident around the older ones. I'm really glad I belonged because it gave me some perspective going into the collegiate greek system.

AOII Angel
09-15-2007, 07:56 AM
Long post, but for those who are interested--

During HS, I belonged to Delta Beta Sigma in my city (deep south). The chapter had primarily members from my public high school but also a few girls from neighboring, wealthy private schools. It was very similar to an NPC group in many ways and I wouldn't be at all shocked if it was a feeder into some of the NPC groups at schools like Ole Miss, LSU, and such, because we really did a lot of the same kinds of activities and most of the women who pledged DBS went on to pledge sororities in college. It was not associated with the HS officially--just a lot of us happened to be members. I think we were asked to wear our pledge pins at school.

Our colors were black and gold. There was a crest, pledge pin, and badge. There was a rush period, held over the course of a few days at different members' homes, with themes, nametags, and refreshments. Bids were extended--it was so exciting because they came to your house, rang the doorbell, and when the door opened, 25-50 screaming girls--the cutest and most popular ones-- chanted, sang, and then asked you to join, followed by lots more screams and hugs when you (of course) accepted. It was very thrilling to be extended a bid, much like the feeling you have on bid day in college.

We had a manual to study, pledge meetings, and we had tests, just like the mem ed tests we took for my NPC sorority. There was ritual for pledging if I recall, and definitely an initiation ceremony, which was a mixture of some silly stuff like blindfolds, but also some typical sorority ritual aspects. I can't recall if there was an official philanthropy. The sorority had a long history dating back to the 1800s and there were founders and all the usual stuff you have to memorize. We had to write from memory the creed of the sorority for one exam. We were on watch by actives all the time during our pledge term, and they could issue demerits for behavior unbecoming a DBS member, if we were caught without the pledge pin, or if we could not recite facts about the sorority when asked.

We had a big sister program. There was a very exciting reveal for that, I clearly recall. I had a really popular, pretty senior as my big sis, and I just thought she was fabulous. She's off in Hollywood now!

DBS had a national HQ, even, somewhere in the deep south. I know for certain there were other chapters. One girl had actually affiliated with our chapter from one in another city when she moved into our town. They had national conventions, just like NPC groups do, though not on the same scale!

The women in my chapter were no different from the ones in college sororities. Some nice, some mature, some not. There were cliques within, and of course, some of the usual cattiness and power plays that pervade houses at the college level. Yet, I also met some very nice girls with whom I became close friends, and one of them is still my friend some 20+ years later.

I do not think such a system could have lasted into the 90s in non southern locales--it is amazing to hear it's still around. It was quite firmly rooted in the kind of Southern tradition that just would not have survived in northern cities. We had fun times, for the most part. My mom and dad, total non Greeks, thought the whole thing was frivolous and a waste of money (oh yeah-we paid national dues too). But I bet now, seeing what a loyal alum I am for my college sorority, they would think differently.

If nothing else, this experience was great training for recruitment and pledging once I got to college. I was prepared for rushing. I knew what to expect during the pledge program and didn't complain when we had to memorize all those historical facts about founders, etc. I understood what it meant to have chapter meetings and parliamentary procedure, elections, etc. I didn't know many of the girls when I joined, and so it was while before I learned to be confident around the older ones. I'm really glad I belonged because it gave me some perspective going into the collegiate greek system.


Hi Sister...I think this is really interesting! There was no hazing involved? You here so much about these HS groups being cruel to their pledges, but then again, I know not to believe everything I hear on TV!

Bamamom13
09-15-2007, 11:28 AM
I was in a sorority in HS. I would have to get out the old, old, yearbook to even remember the name. We did some stupid hazing stuff: dropping pledges off in a graveyard and making them walk back to the sister's house where we were, blindfolding them and putting bananas in the toilet and making them reach in and grab one, really stupid stuff. I think it was fazed out after I graduated. But what was wonderful was that one of my 'big' sisters in HS ended up being my Big Sis in college.

barnard1897
09-15-2007, 05:08 PM
Hi AOII Angel!! :) Roses to you!

The hazing in my DBS chapter was nominal. We were never asked to wear anything to school or forced to do anything we did not want to do in public. The worst I recall was that we had to memorize a lot of the sorority history and could be quizzed on the spot for it--we would be issued a "black mark" for not knowing something, and if you had too many black marks, you were not initiated. On the other hand, gold marks were also handed out for doing positive things. No one ever tried to humiliate us.

I think if there was anything negative, it was the typical thing where some girls were not invited to join. And that was very hard, especially because one of my very good friends went to first round and was not extended a bid later. She lived in the same neighborhood and belonged to the same tennis club and church as many of the chapter members. It was a terrible feeling for her and her mother (this was the deep south) that they didn't accept her. Truth-some of the girls in the chapter were just stuck up and didn't like her. Ultimately, I had to decide how much involvement I wanted in a chapter that excluded someone I cared about so much, so, I became less and less a part of it. I remained friends with some of them, but I owed my allegiance to her because she had been my friend through everything, long before the sorority. It was the right decision, as we are still great friends today.

Like any club, it was a learning experience. A bonus of it was that I already knew the greek alphabet by the time I pledged in college!

hannahleigh<3
10-05-2007, 05:06 PM
im in a high school sororiy and like one of the posts above we dont do that much we have fundraiseres and meetings, and we get tshirts but otherwise not that much. its pretty much just like a big clique but as was mentioned there is tons of hazing for example we couldnt was our hair for a week we could shave at all we had to wear tacky clothes everyday for a week and the poored things (old milk, rotten eggs, cat litter, sardeens, etc) and it got worse every night. they ended up criscoing our hair twice, and we still couldnt wash it. we had to do really embarising things called "air raids" in the middle of hallways. im still not sure it was worth it but i like the idea of having "sisters"

TNPhiMu
10-05-2007, 05:36 PM
There are two highschools sororities here that I know of - Delta Beta Sigma and Alpha Delta Kappa. The ADKs used to make their pledges walk around in these gingham aprons and bows... I had heard that they tended to become AOIIs. We didn't have sororities at my highschool, but there was a fraternity - I don't remember what they were called.

I actually know people that were in both of these orgs! One of my Phi Mu sisters was a DBS in Forrest City, Arkansas. And my mom(who is a ZTA) was a Alpha Delta Kappa in Ripley, TN in the 70's.

I also know of one other one, in the Nashville area. I know that Brentwood HS has "BGC" (Brentwood Girls Cotillion). They have rush and formals and the like but I think are viewed as a service organization. The girl I know who was in it is a Phi Mu at UTK now.

AlphaFrog
10-05-2007, 06:15 PM
im in a high school sororiy and like one of the posts above we dont do that much we have fundraiseres and meetings, and we get tshirts but otherwise not that much. its pretty much just like a big clique but as was mentioned there is tons of hazing for example we couldnt was our hair for a week we could shave at all we had to wear tacky clothes everyday for a week and the poored things (old milk, rotten eggs, cat litter, sardeens, etc) and it got worse every night. they ended up criscoing our hair twice, and we still couldnt wash it. we had to do really embarising things called "air raids" in the middle of hallways. im still not sure it was worth it but i like the idea of having "sisters"

People who do that kind of crap to you aren't sisters.

lillylover3
10-05-2007, 06:27 PM
WOW

This sounds like my High School and the Tri-Hi-Y clubs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alhambra_High_School#Tri-Hi-Y_clubs) my sister was a founding member of Le Aikanes and I was a member of Lanakila. They were not sororities but sorority-like.

Gwyn

ahh! i loved tri hi y- i was VP my jr and sr year of highschool. and i was in leaders club[the "elite" of tri hi y-ha such a joke]. my mom was in hi-y[the girls] back in the day and they would do things with tri hi y[the boys]. but if you were asked to be in leaders, there was "hazing" as in: come get you from the football game and blindfold you and do things to spook you but nothing involving crisco or not shaving.....

nowadays, leaders isn't as exclusive but more intense than tri-hi-y[it combined in the 80's] but it's all run by the YMCA so it would never get out of hand to begin with.

but on another note, i think mobile is the last in AL to really have a strong sorority/fraternity system. in birmingham and montgomery they just have dances[montg: the assembly, camellia ball-girls, the squires-boys, MCC, cotillion] which were pretty much feeders into the debutante balls for college!!

Empress0105
10-07-2007, 01:23 PM
are a waste of time....


there is no way someone of that age can truly understand what it means to be in a sorority and fraternity in the sense of you being in it for life....the only letters they should be worrying about are SAT, ACT and GPA

KSUViolet06
10-07-2007, 04:05 PM
are a waste of time....
the only letters they should be worrying about are SAT, ACT and GPA

Agreed.

ms_gwyn
10-07-2007, 04:32 PM
are a waste of time....


there is no way someone of that age can truly understand what it means to be in a sorority and fraternity in the sense of you being in it for life....the only letters they should be worrying about are SAT, ACT and GPA

Playing devil's advocate ...

1) Some can say the same thing for being in college and focusing on GPA, BS, BA, MCAT, LSAT, GRE, GMAT, etc....

2) Most of the women who created our organizations were in this age group, some were in their 20s but most were in between 15-19.

Every body needs a social outlet and we all know that we have cliques...these are cliques....with community service.

AOII Angel
10-07-2007, 05:25 PM
Playing devil's advocate ...

1) Some can say the same thing for being in college and focusing on GPA, BS, BA, MCAT, LSAT, GRE, GMAT, etc....

2) Most of the women who created our organizations were in this age group, some were in their 20s but most were in between 15-19.

Every body needs a social outlet and we all know that we have cliques...these are cliques....with community service.
Good points, Ms gwyn!
I do, however, think someone should make sure that the hazing is eliminated from these groups. The thing about kids that age is that their brains have often not developed enough to make reasonably enlightened decisions.

libelle
10-07-2007, 11:30 PM
but on another note, i think mobile is the last in AL to really have a strong sorority/fraternity system. in birmingham and montgomery they just have dances[montg: the assembly, camellia ball-girls, the squires-boys, MCC, cotillion] which were pretty much feeders into the debutante balls for college!!

Yes, high school sororities and fraternities are still strong in the Mobile area. And yes, there is a natural progression from certain hs groups to certain NPC groups to the Camellia ball to the Jr League, etc. The Jr League, however, is more diverse than the sororities these days. Pledges of 'the' sorority are called 'rats' and have a list of rules that no NPC group could have.

It is a different world from Long Island where I live now.

DSTCHAOS
10-08-2007, 12:12 AM
Playing devil's advocate ...

1) Some can say the same thing for being in college and focusing on GPA, BS, BA, MCAT, LSAT, GRE, GMAT, etc....

2) Most of the women who created our organizations were in this age group, some were in their 20s but most were in between 15-19.

Every body needs a social outlet and we all know that we have cliques...these are cliques....with community service.

As I always say, the devil doesn't need an advocate. ;)

1) All of our organizations should be interested in college students who focus on GPA, BS, BA, LSAT, etc. The difference is that young adults are more capable of multitasking which is why our colleges and young adult/adult lives aren't structured the same as high schools and children's lives are.

2) Whose organizations?

I'm not opposed to these high school organizations. I think they are lame if they are aided by fraternity and sorority members and taught to mimick them. I also think it's lame if the children wear Greek letters and think they are in a lifetime commitment type of organization or in a stepping stone to GLOs type organization. It's cutesy high school stuff and that's it.

I was the president of a community service organization without Greek letters. We didn't have sororities at my school. Thank God.

Unregistered-
10-08-2007, 12:28 AM
2) Whose organizations?

I'm not familiar with the histories of organizations other than my own, but I remember reading somewhere that many founders of NPC sororities were in the 15-19 year old age group when their organizations were established. These women were students at their respective college/university, and being that this was in the mid-1800s to early 1900s, I'm assuming being that young and in college was the norm.

DSTCHAOS
10-08-2007, 09:37 AM
I'm not familiar with the histories of organizations other than my own, but I remember reading somewhere that many founders of NPC sororities were in the 15-19 year old age group when their organizations were established. These women were students at their respective college/university, and being that this was in the mid-1800s to early 1900s, I'm assuming being that young and in college was the norm.

Thanks for the clarity. :)

Senusret I
10-08-2007, 09:42 AM
Since we're on the topic... does anyone know what the age range of NPHC sorority founders was?

For Alpha, several of our founders would be considered "non-traditional" undergraduates, a few were graduate students, and maybe three were 19. I never really thought about what was going on down at Howard from 1908-1920.

DSTCHAOS
10-08-2007, 09:53 AM
I don't have the patience to look it all up but Naomi Sewell Richardson passed away at 100 in 1993 so that makes her 20 in 1913. I never checked the ages of blacks in college in the 1900s or of every Founder. I'm almost certain that they weren't overwhelmingly high school age but rather 19+, which is college age and doesn't add any support for high school sororities.

exlurker
12-09-2007, 05:14 PM
High School Sorority in Virginia Banned?

A news story out of Danville reports on a decision about the Sub-Debs and another high school sorority:

http://www.registerbee.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=DRB%2FMGArticle%2FDRB_BasicArti cle&c=MGArticle&cid=1173353794324&path=!news

Excerpt (by the way, if this kind of thing were being done in college by an NPC sorority, and word got out or complaints were made, wouldn't the chapter get corrective action from their national?):

Part of the initiation involves girls not washing their hair for a couple of days and carrying “goodie bags” filled with candy. A senior member can require a “rat” to run over and give them candy during the school day.

The “rat” tries to get as many members as possible to sign a book that shows they received candy, but the senior member can rip out that page in the book and make the “rat” start over.

Unregistered-
12-09-2007, 05:38 PM
High School Sorority in Virginia Banned?

A news story out of Danville reports on a decision about the Sub-Debs and another high school sorority:

http://www.registerbee.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=DRB%2FMGArticle%2FDRB_BasicArti cle&c=MGArticle&cid=1173353794324&path=!news (http://www.registerbee.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=DRB%2FMGArticle%2FDRB_BasicArti cle&c=MGArticle&cid=1173353794324&path=%21news)

Excerpt (by the way, if this kind of thing were being done in college by an NPC sorority, and word got out or complaints were made, wouldn't the chapter get corrective action from their national?):

Part of the initiation involves girls not washing their hair for a couple of days and carrying “goodie bags” filled with candy. A senior member can require a “rat” to run over and give them candy during the school day.

The “rat” tries to get as many members as possible to sign a book that shows they received candy, but the senior member can rip out that page in the book and make the “rat” start over.


Does the state of Virginia consider these acts hazing?

If so, someone should educate the co-president on Virginia's hazing law.

AOIIRhoDelta
12-22-2007, 06:55 PM
There were several sororities at the public high school I went to--one in the band (Pi Alpha Zeta? I think...), Kappa Rho, and another that I've forgotten the letters of. Funny thing is that most of the girls in Kappa Rho were also in the other one... it was just an excuse to have 2 extra formals a year and some mild to moderate hazing.

I went to all-girls private school after that and there was an exclusive senior society (the purpose, rituals, etc. were secret, but not the members), a holdover from the days when my school was a college. Most of the girls in it were nice, but I heard about some sketchy hazing (from one of the members) that went on in the school chapel--simulating sexual acts with a banana over the altar, etc. I'm slightly skeptical about that, simply because some of the girls I know in it would NEVER do anything like that. Perhaps, though.

Secret/exclusive societies in high school aren't necessarily horrible, but they can get out of hand. Supposedly societies of their type were not allowed in public school, yet the two non-music sororities had pages in the school yearbook. Also, at my second school, other secret societies/non-registered clubs were banned. Hypocritical, much?

asa06091987
12-23-2007, 10:47 PM
Does the state of Virginia consider these acts hazing?

If so, someone should educate the co-president on Virginia's hazing law.
if you think thats bad--you should hear my college's interpretation of hazing...they're really hypocritical. its hazing to have a member of an organization be alone in a room with a new member of the organization, but they haven't done anything with respect to known hazing that goes on in some local orgs on campus eg: one organization used to kidnap new members of different sororities and then make the sisters do things like jump on trampolines half-naked to get the girls back--

oh and we didnt really have "high school sororities" but we did have a bunch of different clubs to which you needed to appeal for membership, or be specifically invited...some of them were pretty exclusive, but none of them hazed (as far as i know) i think it was mostly to make up for the fact that we dont have greek orgs in my state (college level that is) and a lot of kids in my highschool didnt go away to school...

cuteASAbug
12-23-2007, 10:52 PM
if you think thats bad--you should hear my college's interpretation of hazing...they're really hypocritical. its hazing to have a member of an organization be alone in a room with a new member of the organization, but they haven't done anything with respect to known hazing that goes on in some local orgs on campus eg: one organization used to kidnap new members of different sororities and then make the sisters do things like jump on trampolines half-naked to get the girls back--

oh and we didnt really have "high school sororities" but we did have a bunch of different clubs to which you needed to appeal for membership, or be specifically invited...some of them were pretty exclusive, but none of them hazed (as far as i know) i think it was mostly to make up for the fact that we dont have greek orgs in my state (college level that is) and a lot of kids in my highschool didnt go away to school...
I thought URI has a fairly large Greek system?

Corsulian
12-24-2007, 02:19 AM
I'm not familiar with the histories of organizations other than my own, but I remember reading somewhere that many founders of NPC sororities were in the 15-19 year old age group when their organizations were established. These women were students at their respective college/university, and being that this was in the mid-1800s to early 1900s, I'm assuming being that young and in college was the norm.

Not that this is particularly relevant (but neither are HS sororities outside of hazing issues...so there), but there were few norms in those days. I've often tried to paint the picture of mid 1800s college life to new members who read about our founders like they were a bunch of crazies and laugh about the fact that we even have songs. It's not like there were indie rock bands to see at the club, or electricity, or cars, or much in the way of public education. Liberal Arts degrees weren't too popular either. If you got to college, you probably had a lot of money or you were very smart and got some nice scholarship money. Several of our founders attended academies after elementary school and they were basically college preparation. You could excel and get in college at 15 or be a late arrival at 25. Most founders were probably about 18-20 though since secret organizations are generally created by upper classmen.